American eugenics program: NC sterilization victims to be compensated

Discussion in 'Soap Box' started by Prinnctopher's Belt, Sep 11, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

    U.S. NEWS July 26, 2013, 1:46 p.m. ET

    North Carolina to Compensate Sterilization Victims
    State Sets $10 Million Pool to Pay Subjects in Eugenics Program


    RALEIGH, N.C.—North Carolina will spend $10 million to compensate men and women who were sterilized in the state's eugenics program, which was among the most extensive and long-running of its kind.

    North Carolina sterilized 7,600 people from 1929 to 1974 who were deemed socially or mentally unfit. Victims were as young as 10 years old and nearly all were sterilized forcibly or with inadequate consent, according to the state.

    The Legislature this past week approved a $10 million compensation fund that would begin paying out in June 2015. So far the state has identified 177 living victims. The amount of compensation each receives will depend on the number of verified claims, according to the state Department of Administration. If 200 people are verified, for example, each would receive $50,000.

    "The money don't take up the place of what happened," said Willis Lynch, an 80-year-old retired handyman who was sterilized at age 14 after being deemed mentally unfit. "I'm glad they did something, though."

    Mr. Lynch said he was sent to a school for the mentally and developmentally disabled after his widowed mother could no longer care for her seven children. Records from the state's eugenics board show that in the late 1940s no one from that school was to leave without being sterilized, except in cases where children had been committed in error.
    While 30 states had eugenics programs in the early 20th century, North Carolina was one of the few that accelerated its program after a backlash against the eugenics practices of Nazi Germany. Mr. Stam says that nearly 80% of the state's sterilizations took place after 1945.

    In the program's early days, the people who were sterilized were in proportion to the state's racial mix, Mr. Stam said. But in the 1960s, the program began to sterilize black people at a disproportionate rate of 60% even though blacks only represented about 25% of the state population. Eighty-five percent of those sterilized over the lifetime of the program were women.

    Read the entire article in Wall Street Journal:
  2. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

    A study by the U.S. General Accounting Office finds that 4 of the 12 Indian Health Service regions sterilized 3,406 American Indian women without their permission between 1973 and 1976. The GAO finds that 36 women under age 21 had been forcibly sterilized during this period despite a court-ordered moratorium on sterilizations of women younger than 21.

    Two years earlier, an independent study by Dr. Connie Pinkerton-Uri, Choctaw/Cherokee, found that one in four American Indian women had been sterilized without her consent. PInkerton-Uri’s research indicated that the Indian Health Service had “singled out full-blooded Indian women for sterilization procedures.”
  3. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

    The Horrifying American Roots of Nazi Eugenics

    Hitler and his henchmen victimized an entire continent and exterminated millions in his quest for a co-called "Master Race." But the concept of a white, blond-haired, blue-eyed master Nordic race didn't originate with Hitler. The idea was created in the United States, and cultivated in California, decades before Hitler came to power. California eugenicists played an important, although little known, role in the American eugenics movement's campaign for ethnic cleansing.

    Eugenics was the racist pseudoscience determined to wipe away all human beings deemed "unfit," preserving only those who conformed to a Nordic stereotype. Elements of the philosophy were enshrined as national policy by forced sterilization and segregation laws, as well as marriage restrictions, enacted in twenty-seven states. In 1909, California became the third state to adopt such laws. Ultimately, eugenics practitioners coercively sterilized some 60,000 Americans, barred the marriage of thousands, forcibly segregated thousands in "colonies," and persecuted untold numbers in ways we are just learning. Before World War II, nearly half of coercive sterilizations were done in California, and even after the war, the state accounted for a third of all such surgeries.

    Read the full article by author Edwin Black:
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.