Another irrational fear

Discussion in 'I Have a Question...' started by Witty_Sarcasm, May 20, 2015.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Witty_Sarcasm

    Witty_Sarcasm Writer, Musician, Fun Lover, Magic Maker

    This is probably going to sound stupid, and I hope I don't trigger anyone by posting this, but how do you get over the fear of death? No, I don't want to get over it so it would be easier to end my life. I want to get over it because every time I think about it, I will have a great sense of fear and panic. Everyone I talk to tells me they are not afraid of death, and I wonder how, when thinking of it will make my heart race and turn my insides to jelly. I know it is irrational, but I know why it scares me more than anything. I can overcome a fear of bees, or snakes, or heights, but since death is inevitable, I can't shake that fear. I am scared of losing everyone and then losing my own life. I am scared of how it will feel and what happens afterwards. So, how do I overcome this fear, or at least stop thinking of it so often?
  2. SillyOldBear

    SillyOldBear Teddy Bear Fanatic Staff Member Safety & Support

    I am not sure that I believe those who say they are not afraid of death. To me, it seems to be a very natural fear. There is not anything irrational about it. After all, we don't truly know what death is like. We all have our beliefs. As a Christian, I believe there is a better world waiting me. But I can still feel fear. After all, I have never talked to someone who has died and actually experienced the afterlife so I don't really know what it like. And a fear of death can be a healthy fear. How many people who utilize this site would be long gone if there was not a fear of death. I find that I don't fear 'being dead' as much as I do 'the process of dying'. I have no fondness for pain and a long protracted death does scare me. That is true even though I live in a state that offers physician assisted suicide.

    How do you overcome that fear? I am not sure it should be completely overcome. But perhaps by talking to ministers, doctors, or senior citizens you might learn something that will help you control your fear. I know both of my parents were looking forward to death by the time it came to them. They were ill and sought the relief it would bring. I think that happens for many of us. By the time death calls, we are ready to welcome it. We just have to be sure that we don't rush it.
  3. Witty_Sarcasm

    Witty_Sarcasm Writer, Musician, Fun Lover, Magic Maker

    Thank you for your input, it's much appreciated :hug: I have been coming up with ways to cope, so I won't have to think about things too much. So I hope that will help me in the long run.
  4. johnnysays

    johnnysays Well-Known Member

    Ya. I think ti's actually common, but customarily under the radar. Must inspect, push mind.

    Here: - Death anxiety increases atheists' unconscious belief in God...
    Translation: Non-religious people, when death primed, were more cautious about denying existence of God.

    Want more? - Mortality salience...

    And another study: - Death anxiety prompts people to believe in intelligent design, reject evolution: research...
    Translation: People desire meaning and purpose in life when they're death primed.

    Note: I bolded part of the quote because the title of this news piece is misleading.

    And yet another (in case I haven't chased you away yet): - Scientific faith: Belief in science increases in the face of stress and existential anxiety...
    Translation: The science and religious world views offer meaning and assurance to people, calming death anxiety.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, 2015
  5. total eclipse

    total eclipse SF Friend Staff Alumni

    You live in the moment ok don't think to far ahead just deal with what is given to you each day and enjoy it to the most you can As you said death is inevitable so try not to dwell on it instead dwell on living hugs
  6. Witty_Sarcasm

    Witty_Sarcasm Writer, Musician, Fun Lover, Magic Maker

    Thank you both for the advice and the information :) It has helped me look at death in a different light. I haven't been panicking or dwelling on it since I started taking Lexapro. I think of it sometimes, it seems a bit surreal but at least now I can live without fear or worrying about the end too much. I just try to live each moment and not fathom the future, because I have no idea what will happen.
  7. shadowonthewall

    shadowonthewall Well-Known Member

    I don't think that the fear of death is something you can just make yourself get over. Perhaps your fear will be ameliorated over time. Just remember that there is probably nothing about the state of being dead to fear. You aren't scared of the time before you were born, are you? However it makes sense to be afraid of dying. I think that the fear of the dying process in suicide is what still keeps me alive, but if I had the chance to pass away peacefully in my sleep, that would not scare me and I might even do that right now if it were an option.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.