• Please read the thread in Forum News and Announcements pertaining to race related discussion on SF - thank you :)

Asked an RN about long term Ativan use

#1
So I asked a retired RN friend about the long term use of Ativan. She said she has known many people who have taken it in excess of 20 years. She knows my situation, debilitating autoimmune disease, I am 62,:etc.....and she pretty much said ‘If you can find a dr who will give It to you consistently, go for it’....Will it help my depression, self loathing, etc....no, but it will keep me calm enough to not do anything foolish for now. Is it addictive, yes....honestly I don’t care as it gives me some decent years.
For what it is worth, I thought I would share.....peace to all.
 

MisterBGone

Well-Known Member
#3
Another possibility to consider, would be to ask your doctor about what long term impact, or ramifications might be expected, were you to take this drug for an extended period? (And then just wait & see if they tell you anything you don’t already know. . .) // while it may seem insignificant to worry about now - what may happen then — in the future — perhaps one day (5 / 10 / 15 / 20 years from now) - it will / (or may!) / not. . :) that’s what I would do, if I were you—but I realize that I am not! ;) take care & hoping for the best... & I’m quite certain that you’ve already discussed with, and asked whether or not there are any alternative solutions pharmaceutically that might serve the same purpose (or meet the same means to the, or an, end?) : ) peace-
 
#4
Another possibility to consider, would be to ask your doctor about what long term impact, or ramifications might be expected, were you to take this drug for an extended period? (And then just wait & see if they tell you anything you don’t already know. . .) // while it may seem insignificant to worry about now - what may happen then — in the future — perhaps one day (5 / 10 / 15 / 20 years from now) - it will / (or may!) / not. . :) that’s what I would do, if I were you—but I realize that I am not! ;) take care & hoping for the best... & I’m quite certain that you’ve already discussed with, and asked whether or not there are any alternative solutions pharmaceutically that might serve the same purpose (or meet the same means to the, or an, end?) : ) peace-
Thanks....dr did mention Hydroxyzine....I have ptsd...am in therapy...basically I am a mess.
 

MisterBGone

Well-Known Member
#6
Thanks....dr did mention Hydroxyzine....I have ptsd...am in therapy...basically I am a mess.
Oh, that name rings a bell — but you see, every time I am out of work, and not in there working with these things/medications, it seems I instantly forget what so many of them are, or do! It’s kind of like with the wine list at a fancy restaurant I once served at... knew the thing like the back of my hand at one point- now couldn’t tell you a single thing about any of them! ;) one ☝️ question though, and I’m sorry for whatever the trauma is you’ve suffered from, but is or does the therapy help?? (I certainly hope so!). . . And again, as you know, we all have different body chemistries, reactions to medications, genetic backgrounds & histories (so even if we, ourselves have never had dependency issues - if it’s in our blood, there’s something to consider...), and just because one person has one experience with one drug, that doesn’t automatically translate to anything. (Though it may. . .) — this is what I was talking about when getting into a discussion with your doctor about, and if he or she doesn’t know the answer in a satisfactory answer, maybe you can find some one who does (even if, especially it happens to be a specialist); which by the way, you may or may not have already seen for your autoimmune... And then there is how this med you’re interested would, or wouldn’t not interact in a positive, negative or no such way at all, comes into play. Which again is where the good doctor is supposed to help do their job (by filling your head up with useful answers). I’m sure if I were in your shoes, I’d want to try something like this too. Have they explained or compared & contrasted the differences and etc, with the alternative medication that was suggested or recommended? Good luck!!! 🍀👍:)
 
#7
Oh, that name rings a bell — but you see, every time I am out of work, and not in there working with these things/medications, it seems I instantly forget what so many of them are, or do! It’s kind of like with the wine list at a fancy restaurant I once served at... knew the thing like the back of my hand at one point- now couldn’t tell you a single thing about any of them! ;) one ☝️ question though, and I’m sorry for whatever the trauma is you’ve suffered from, but is or does the therapy help?? (I certainly hope so!). . . And again, as you know, we all have different body chemistries, reactions to medications, genetic backgrounds & histories (so even if we, ourselves have never had dependency issues - if it’s in our blood, there’s something to consider...), and just because one person has one experience with one drug, that doesn’t automatically translate to anything. (Though it may. . .) — this is what I was talking about when getting into a discussion with your doctor about, and if he or she doesn’t know the answer in a satisfactory answer, maybe you can find some one who does (even if, especially it happens to be a specialist); which by the way, you may or may not have already seen for your autoimmune... And then there is how this med you’re interested would, or wouldn’t not interact in a positive, negative or no such way at all, comes into play. Which again is where the good doctor is supposed to help do their job (by filling your head up with useful answers). I’m sure if I were in your shoes, I’d want to try something like this too. Have they explained or compared & contrasted the differences and etc, with the alternative medication that was suggested or recommended? Good luck!!! 🍀👍:)
Therapy has yet to really help. I know pills aren’t necessarily the answer.....however I do not see my anxiety ending any time soon....ptsd is a killer....literally.
 

MisterBGone

Well-Known Member
#8
Therapy has yet to really help. I know pills aren’t necessarily the answer.....however I do not see my anxiety ending any time soon....ptsd is a killer....literally.
Certainly is better than the alternative (pills to death!)! :^) I’d see about blending my honesty, with a very careful measure of not giving off the impression, that I am, “med-seeking,” . . . (But that is just me!) __And he or she may very well not even place you into that more dangerous potential category in the first place, given your other debilitating affliction. I don’t know... but do wish you, all the best! : )
 

MisterBGone

Well-Known Member
#9
For what it’s worth, and this may very well be “diddly squat,” as most of the instances or cases I’m thinking of don’t really have much of anything to do with you; but I’ve worked with a number of women who were on benzodiazepines: prescribed regularly, and sometimes also with another as a prn. . . Now most of these patients were half your age, and dealing with severe mental health struggles (not that you’re not, but that led what their psychiatrists evidentially thought, was that the therapeutic threshold or whatever standard they go by in order to diagnose, the benefits of taking the drugs, every day, sometime multiple times a day (they’ve were obviously limits on the PRN - administration), outweighed the downsides, or consequences and eventual effects. :)
 
#10
For what it’s worth, and this may very well be “diddly squat,” as most of the instances or cases I’m thinking of don’t really have much of anything to do with you; but I’ve worked with a number of women who were on benzodiazepines: prescribed regularly, and sometimes also with another as a prn. . . Now most of these patients were half your age, and dealing with severe mental health struggles (not that you’re not, but that led what their psychiatrists evidentially thought, was that the therapeutic threshold or whatever standard they go by in order to diagnose, the benefits of taking the drugs, every day, sometime multiple times a day (they’ve were obviously limits on the PRN - administration), outweighed the downsides, or consequences and eventual effects. :)
So if I understand you correctly, the physicians thought that giving them the Benzos for long term use, and accepting the consequences, whatever they may be, was better than not giving it to them at all.
 

MisterBGone

Well-Known Member
#11
So if I understand you correctly, the physicians thought that giving them the Benzos for long term use, and accepting the consequences, whatever they may be, was better than not giving it to them at all.
In so far as I understood it, yes... And while in some cases, these individuals displayed rather extreme forms, or examples of “diagnostic features,” associated with the usual disorders tied into these drugs, many of them were still, very highly functional (such as the ability to hold jobs). Others, just staying out of the hospital was an achievement, of sorts. . . But that’s just my best guess! And not necessarily 100% fact- you’d have to talk with and to your physician for that. As I have found, even if it may seem so on the surface (these people are taking these two anti anxiety meds at roughly the same dosages, and frequencies throughout the day, week etc. & maybe even have the same diagnoses—), no two cases are exactly alike. : ) good luck! I’m pulling for you...
 

Please Donate to Help Keep SF Running

Total amount
$30.00
Goal
$255.00
Top