Cant stop eating

Discussion in 'Mental Health Disorders' started by Farandaway674, Aug 2, 2013.

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  1. Farandaway674

    Farandaway674 Member

    All my life I struggled with a food dependency issues, recently it reached a kind of critical point where I 400 pounds. Ironically besides sleep apena and some slight trouble walking for long period of times health wise I have been pretty lucky. Still I decided to do something about it and am in the process of going for clearance for the gastric sleeve operation. Unfourtently I have to loose a small amount of weight but am having trouble doing it. I am petrified about my health, I hate the way I look but I still can't seem to stop pigging out. I can last a day or two with healthier eating and I keep telling myself tommrow will be the day I change but I never do. At this juncture I am literally killing myself with food but I don't seem strong enough to make the changes necessary.
     
  2. meaningless-vessel

    meaningless-vessel Well-Known Member

    Well, firstly it's great that you want to do something about the position you find yourself in.

    But on the flip side, you have to figure out what sets off your eating, be it boredom, loneliness, or something else, and you have to develop a sense of self control.

    If you truly want to do something, you'll approach it with the attitude of "I can do this, nothing will get in my way". It's easy to say, but only you can do this for you. Breaking out of habits and a comfort zone - that's what I sense is needed, but people can do this. (I've seen example TV shows on this, where people have started at a higher weight than 400 pounds - and gone on to be successful. Maybe you just need support and encouragement to not return to - as you put it - "pigging out".
     
  3. flowers

    flowers Senior Member

    hi. Sorry. i didnt see this before now. I would have responded much sooner. I want to tell you that I understand some of what you are feeling. I have had horrible compulsive eating patterns for all my life. Fighting it is exhausting and horribly painful. I believe that only someone who has lived with it can really undestand.

    I do think its great that you are taking the action to deal with it. Since the surgery is dependent on your losing some weight, I am wondering if you would be interested in trying out OA. Because i know there is support there. I do not know if you are interested. But if you are, and you cannot go to meetings in your area, I think there are online communities. I think there are even phone communities. I cannot do the 12 steps because I am too shame based. But believe me, I have great respect for the program. And I wish I could be a candidate. Because there is amazing support there.

    Another suggestion that might work out ( and I do not know) is to call the phone number for the national eating disorders association. Explain your situation. And then ask what local help there is. If you do not get a satisfactory answer then please email them. Their phone number is 800-931-2237 and they can be reached 9-5 eastern standard time. If you prefer you can email them at info@NationalEatingDisorders.org I dont . know if they can help with a referral. But that is what they do. More important, I do not know if it feels right for you to call or email. Just because I suggest it, doesnt mean its right for you to contact them :hug:

    Something occurred to me. Would it make sense for you to call your doctor's office and ask them what resources you can turn to for support? Because you are having a very hard time losing what needs to be lost for the surgery. It seems to me that this would be very common. That people who need to lose weight for the surgery would need help and support. If they could do it on their own why would they need the surgery? Just a thought.

    I know you wrote this several days ago. I hope you come back to see this. Please know I am sending caring to you
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 8, 2013
  4. morning rush

    morning rush Well-Known Member

    I so understand what you mean, I was 307 pounds, well not now, I am at 295 pounds, but it's really hard to lose weight. And when you don't have support it can be even harder. My mom supports me, but she doesn't tell me what to do or pressure me into anything. For me, weight lifting did make me lose some weight. You don't have to do many exercises to lose weight either.

    And recently I found out I was allergic to gluten (which is wheat) so I stopped eating it, and I lost a few pounds...

    what I've noticed is that I do in small dosage, I try for a few days, and then I might slip up but that's okay, I can always start again anytime and that's what I do...so don't give up, keep at it, even when you pig out, keep going back to healthy eating or stuff like that.

    do you have anyone at home that can support and encourage you? Like a friend of family member? Or keep writing here and you'll get support :)
     
  5. Geworfenheit

    Geworfenheit Member

    Have you ever given paleo a fair chance? Basically, if your appetite is not proportional to your body's energy needs, it's simply a matter of finding the correct foods and only eating those. You'll probably find yourself craving carbs like crazy, but once you get through the withdrawal (and it may as well be as bad as heroin withdrawal), you'll find that your appetite has completely changed.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbK-UoA7IpI

    Give that guy's video a listen. While his title isn't literally true, his main point is absolutely correct: if you have a significant amount of weight to lose, it's not about exercise or caloric restriction, it's almost entirely about eating the correct types of foods. I also have to second his recommendation on Taubes' book Good Calories, Bad Calories. It'll change the way you think about everything you eat. I've got it in eBook form if you'd like it.
     
  6. Geworfenheit

    Geworfenheit Member

    Have you ever given paleo a fair chance? Basically, if your appetite is not proportional to your body's energy needs, it's simply a matter of finding the correct foods and only eating those. You'll probably find yourself craving carbs like crazy, but once you get through the withdrawal (and it may as well be as bad as heroin withdrawal), you'll find that your appetite has completely changed.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbK-UoA7IpI

    Give that guy's video a listen. While his title isn't literally true, his main point is absolutely correct: if you have a significant amount of weight to lose, it's not about exercise or caloric restriction, it's almost entirely about eating the correct types of foods. I also have to second his recommendation on Taubes' book Good Calories, Bad Calories. It'll change the way you think about everything you eat. I've got it in eBook form if you'd like it.
     
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