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Does anyone watch ASMR

Velveteen Bunny

Well-Known Member
#1
I was looking up "suicide help" on you tube, because I know and watch several different doctors on there and was wondering if any of them that I watch (or others) had videos on the topic, and if any of them offer phone consultations (just in case). I would feel more comfortable talking to someone I've been listening to in videos for several months than to go to see a stranger (not that I ever will -- been there, done that.) Anyway, I was surprised to see that some people have done ASMR videos, and that made me feel gratitude, as I do enjoy watching ASMR. It's hard for me to sleep at night, and if I can watch/listen to someone with a soothing voice who takes my mind off things, I'm able to get to sleep. Of course I also take a bunch of supplemental sleep aides as well, but the videos help with my thought track being put on hold.

Here are a few that look promising...



 

Baywasp

I want wind to blow
SF Supporter
#3
I mostly enjoy cooking/baking ASMR myself. Cooking tree 쿠킹트리 on Youtube makes beautiful desserts, and HidaMari Cooking does it well too. I know this isn't exactly what you're referring to, but it is ASMR still, and I find it really relaxing. And there's typically even a recipe you can follow if you're so inclined.

 

Velveteen Bunny

Well-Known Member
#5
This is what I was originally looking for. My latest search was "suicidal ideation" and although it isn't ASMR, it serves the purpose. I found this video from Dr. Grande, a doctor I watch regularly (I like his true crime break-downs). He has a soothing voice which I can listen to while sleeping and he doesn't wake me up. (I have to listen to someone talking all night, because I got into the habit and now I need it for anxiety relief. Hopefully one day when I can live alone and in peace, I won't need all of these props.)

 

Velveteen Bunny

Well-Known Member
#6
Someone's comment from Dr. Grande's video posted above:

"they are best served by clinicians who can actively engage them”
This.

When I’m acutely suicidal, the one thing that would truly help me is to be able to openly speak to my Dr (not some helpline) who knows me. If only she could debate with me, not be emotional (I am not emotional at those times)... but my Dr’s only option is to send me to a locked ward, where truth be told, I’m more likely to take action. So I lie... and she knows it. It’s an awful state of affairs for all involved. I know of patients who have lost drs/psychologists when admitting to suicidal ideation.... it’s quite common.

Clinician’s, talk to your patients... as individuals. We all have different needs and shouldn’t have to experience this alone. Get training if you need it. It’s part of your job."

Me speaking: which is why I think it's dangerous to admit that I am depressed or suicidal, because anyone you ever talk to (unless they are special) will panic and say the first things off the top of their head or in the case of doctors, what they are trained to say. I don't think most people even really want to KNOW and you telling them is putting a burden on them that in order to not be uncaring in their own eyes, have to respond with something positive and platitudes that don't really help the situation. Maybe I'm being cynical but I am a realist and pick up on how people feel/think by the micro-expressions and body language and what they say.
 
Last edited:

MisterBGone

SF Supporter
#9
Someone's comment from Dr. Grande's video posted above:

"they are best served by clinicians who can actively engage them”
This.

When I’m acutely suicidal, the one thing that would truly help me is to be able to openly speak to my Dr (not some helpline) who knows me. If only she could debate with me, not be emotional (I am not emotional at those times)... but my Dr’s only option is to send me to a locked ward, where truth be told, I’m more likely to take action. So I lie... and she knows it. It’s an awful state of affairs for all involved. I know of patients who have lost drs/psychologists when admitting to suicidal ideation.... it’s quite common.

Clinician’s, talk to your patients... as individuals. We all have different needs and shouldn’t have to experience this alone. Get training if you need it. It’s part of your job."

Me speaking: which is why I think it's dangerous to admit that I am depressed or suicidal, because anyone you ever talk to (unless they are special) will panic and say the first things off the top of their head or in the case of doctors, what they are trained to say. I don't think most people even really want to KNOW and you telling them is putting a burden on them that in order to not be uncaring in their own eyes, have to respond with something positive and platitudes that don't really help the situation. Maybe I'm being cynical but I am a realist and pick up on how people feel/think by the micro-expressions and body language and what they say.
Sounds to me like you'd make a great clinician/dr.! ; ) truth be told, they're paid to "read people," which may be one reason why you haven't found the same success with other resources (than your own personal) when in a crisis state, or something more closely related & connected to it? But you're right, very often they are thinking of your safety as a primary means, or source of inspiration, or meaning of emphasis (realize I am picking all the wrong words...) but my mind & brain is/are quite "Scatterbrianed_?" at the moment- :)* ! ~oh, & by the way... I don't even know what asmr means, is it like edmr? or emr? or edm (which I also don't know what that, or it, means!) : ) but sometimes, these doctors, that is their "fail-safe." When in doubt, take / pick the option which will most likely keep you safe, and their record from suffering another, "strike~!" (or 'blemish,') against it. Now, i have found that the most well-trained & therefore both competent & confident (funny how those two things tend to always go hand-in-hand. . .) that is to say the most "experienced," (& the "right," kind of experience, by the way!) are less likely to freak-out & make rash decisions - such as over-reacting & throwing you into the unit/psych ward. Unless, they've got good reason to do so. They can, as I said, read you & the situation, take in all of your information & make a "correct," diagnosis of the situation (on how best to "read & react.."). Sometimes, it's a med change, or a scheduling a visit with them and then the therapist or a participation in a parital hospitilization program (day) for patients with suicidal ideation, and so on. The less comfortable in their abilities, professionally or what have you, are likely to give you the knee-jerk, reaction. 'Better safe, than sorry!' They think / say / and more often than not, Do- but once you've started to build up a "track-record," or a file begins to be built on you. And they can establish that this is more likely a pattern of behavior, or failed coping mechanisms to keep you out of the lock down facililty. The more likely they will be to 'reject,' your advances; warnings; & think more along the lines of, "The boy/or girl, who cried Wolf?" Not always, but it/that CAN happen. . . :) Anyway, not sure if you have ever been, but inpatient isn't that bad or the end of the world. It is generally not like you see in the movies, but more like I suppose a documentary, if you're going to consider that analogy. In that it is truly "reality~." Trust me, the more times you're in there, the less phased you are by any of it. There can be chaos all around & you'll be sitting there thinking, "Can someone please pass me the sugar for my Corn Flakes?" (barely batting an eye, or taking a deep breath) as alarms & sirens are going off & staff look like fire ants flying up someone's leg in late July/Early August of the Texas heat whilst out in the back yard, giving that gas lawn mower - "a~go!" ;)
 

Velveteen Bunny

Well-Known Member
#10
Sounds to me like you'd make a great clinician/dr.! ; ) truth be told, they're paid to "read people," which may be one reason why you haven't found the same success with other resources (than your own personal) when in a crisis state, or something more closely related & connected to it? But you're right, very often they are thinking of your safety as a primary means, or source of inspiration, or meaning of emphasis (realize I am picking all the wrong words...) but my mind & brain is/are quite "Scatterbrianed_?" at the moment- :)* ! ~oh, & by the way... I don't even know what asmr means, is it like edmr? or emr? or edm (which I also don't know what that, or it, means!) : ) but sometimes, these doctors, that is their "fail-safe." When in doubt, take / pick the option which will most likely keep you safe, and their record from suffering another, "strike~!" (or 'blemish,') against it. Now, i have found that the most well-trained & therefore both competent & confident (funny how those two things tend to always go hand-in-hand. . .) that is to say the most "experienced," (& the "right," kind of experience, by the way!) are less likely to freak-out & make rash decisions - such as over-reacting & throwing you into the unit/psych ward. Unless, they've got good reason to do so. They can, as I said, read you & the situation, take in all of your information & make a "correct," diagnosis of the situation (on how best to "read & react.."). Sometimes, it's a med change, or a scheduling a visit with them and then the therapist or a participation in a parital hospitilization program (day) for patients with suicidal ideation, and so on. The less comfortable in their abilities, professionally or what have you, are likely to give you the knee-jerk, reaction. 'Better safe, than sorry!' They think / say / and more often than not, Do- but once you've started to build up a "track-record," or a file begins to be built on you. And they can establish that this is more likely a pattern of behavior, or failed coping mechanisms to keep you out of the lock down facililty. The more likely they will be to 'reject,' your advances; warnings; & think more along the lines of, "The boy/or girl, who cried Wolf?" Not always, but it/that CAN happen. . . :) Anyway, not sure if you have ever been, but inpatient isn't that bad or the end of the world. It is generally not like you see in the movies, but more like I suppose a documentary, if you're going to consider that analogy. In that it is truly "reality~." Trust me, the more times you're in there, the less phased you are by any of it. There can be chaos all around & you'll be sitting there thinking, "Can someone please pass me the sugar for my Corn Flakes?" (barely batting an eye, or taking a deep breath) as alarms & sirens are going off & staff look like fire ants flying up someone's leg in late July/Early August of the Texas heat whilst out in the back yard, giving that gas lawn mower - "a~go!" ;)
I was quoting someone that I agreed with in a YouTube comment, it wasn't me who said it. So, I can't take the credit, haha.

I have been in a psych ward twice, and don't want a repeat. Maybe for some people, it's no big deal, but I value my freedom and privacy to an extreme extent.
 

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