'Dr. Death' out of prision

Discussion in 'Soap Box' started by Sakura, Jun 1, 2007.

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  1. Sakura

    Sakura Well-Known Member

    Well Dr. Kevorkian (or Dr. Death as some call him), has finally been released from prison after being there for 8 years. For those of you who don't know, Dr. Kevorkian was well-known as the doctor back in the 90's, who helped his patients (mainly terminally-ill ones), to commit suicide. He is mainly the reason why the phrase 'assisted-suicide' became such a mainstream phrase.

    Story here

    Now he's out of prison, and once again a free man, and I was just curious about what you all thought about him, his (former) practices of helping people to die, and what your own views on assisted suicide were ^^

  2. ybt

    ybt Guest

    i can't believe they sent him to prison in the first place, unless it was some horrible other charge. i'm very glad he's out.
  3. What message does that give? Isn't euthanasia first degree murder?

    This is a prolife website. Or is it only prolife on suicide?

    Help people live, not die.

    I really don't know, it's not easy for anyone that wishes to die.

    I certainly oppose it for people with mental health problems eg. depresssion. And anyone that doesn't is not normal.
  4. muslim

    muslim Well-Known Member

    dr. death is guilty
    and they are mistaken to let him out

    he is a dotor .me and you and all of us found patients their illness is hopless
    and they live and become healthy again.

    we must give hope to patient

    god have the key of life or death not that strange doctor
  5. a doctor is supposed to heal people

    killing someone, is that now a medical procedure like abortion
  6. Esmeralda

    Esmeralda Well-Known Member

    Agreed. It is a violation of a Hippocratic oath to help a patient to commit suicide. If someone wants to die that bad, they will find a way. The methods Kevorkian used are not that much different than the way a lot of people off themselves anyway. If we make suicide too easy for people and make it socially acceptable, it won't be long before we legalize the suicides of people with physical or mental disabilities. It is a very slippery slope.

    The more we devalue human life, the more it becomes acceptable to discriminate against the elderly, the sick, the mentally handicapped, the physically handicapped, etc. This is how Hitler got started.
  7. ybt

    ybt Guest

    i would rather he knows how to kill somebody rather than that person suffering the after effects
  8. Amen Peanut, we can finally agree on something
  9. Esmeralda

    Esmeralda Well-Known Member

    Yay! :)
  10. Esmeralda

    Esmeralda Well-Known Member

    The really sad thing is I saw a news report from the U.K. about doctors who are trying to legalize the euthanization of handicapped babies. How horrible :(
  11. ybt

    ybt Guest

    no, the babies thing i do disagree with.
  12. Raven

    Raven Guest

    I for one thought they should never have locked him up, death is something we all have to face, for those people who are terminally ill and theirs lives are one of constant pain who are we to tell them they must live.If a dog gets to sick to continue on living and the suffering is deemed greater then the value of life we will allow the euthanization of the animal. If a human wanted to make that end of life choice (We are talking the terminally ill) we deny it to them. I am glad to see he is free.

  13. Spearmint

    Spearmint Well-Known Member

    I dunno. The way I look at it is, most of the people he 'helped' were terminally ill, therefore they were going to die soon anyway, so really, he just gave them a little push to get there. I think it's different 'helping' someone who's terminally ill, and a healthy person...
  14. Esmeralda

    Esmeralda Well-Known Member

    But a dog is not a human being. Life has nothing to teach a dog. A dog can learn nothing through suffering, but humans can. And if someone wants to kill themselves, it's not that hard. Kevorkian's machine is not that complicated or elaborate. I truly feel bad for the terminally ill, but it is not a doctor's place or job to kill a patient.
  15. Freddy

    Freddy Guest

    I sorta what became of him. Now I know.

    hymm makes me wonder if he's going to write a book now?! (it seems like everyone else is doing it.)
  16. Syd

    Syd Guest

    Michele Fletcher comes to mind.

    I personally find biographical stories boring as hell. It's the literary equivalent of reality television shows. It's almost as bad as reading someone's personal diary-blog.

    When I take the plunge into good literature, it's for a pleasant escape from reality, hence my affinity for avant-garde, fantasy, and imaginative literary art.
  17. I could argue and get really upset at a few of you, though I won't do so here, as I know it can cause alot of problems, and I really don't want that. I'll just state that I have a terminal/incurable illness, and that I want to have the option to have a doctor kill me when my life becomes unbearable. I don't want pro-life religious fanatics to tell me that I don't have the right-to-die and that a doctor doesn't have the right to help me die. I am glad that Dr. Kevorkian is out of prison, and I hope he will continue to fight the injustice done by inhumane laws which force people to endure suffering, when they could have a painless means of hastening death.
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2007
  18. Syd

    Syd Guest

    I'm with you on that Broken Product. As I mentioned in another thread, I'm pro-choice on the issue of suicide.

    It's a controversial issue, and some cases seem more acceptable than others, but I honestly believe the individual should have the right to end their own life if they so choose.

    I didn't want to mention this, for the same reason you didn't - it's not a discussion I really want to be involved in.

    Then again, I've found SFers to be pretty mature about these topics, so I suspect the thread can stay peaceful after all.
  19. Well, personally I'm all for the man getting out. I see nothing wrong with him assisting suicide to patients that honestly want it and all. I understand wanting limitations on it (age, illness, experiences, etc.) but I do understand to benefits of assisted suicide. I'd rather see someone go peacefully than them seriously hurt themselves and remain alive, in more pain and suffering for a longer period of time.
    Anyway though, you have to take into account that dogs are pretty much part of society with us today. If you were to shoot a cop dog then it is equal to shooting the cop himself. People clothe dogs, dogs have jobs (cop, seeing-eye, protectors), and we rely on dogs for a lot of emotional support even. I also think dogs can learn through suffering--they understand when we are in pain and they comfort us, if they are beaten they know to discontinue that activity, they become aggressive over their owner's safety, they even mourn when we pass on. Dogs are put here for a purpose and I'd like to think that they do learn something from living and they take that onto the afterlife and their energy/spirit doesn't just disappear.

  20. Excuse me, but I have to respond this. I'm physically handicapped, and I don't appreciate you telling me that my ending my life because of my illness is somehow devaluing. It is not discrimination either. It is fairness.
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