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Is having a business when depressed and anxious worth it? How do you deal with work stress?

Shannew

Well-Known Member
#1
Hi guys, I've been feeling very overwhelmed in the last few weeks. I started a skin treatment business about 6 weeks ago. It was going great, I had a decent number of people in, then my area became a hotspot and business went down. I had a few bad experiences with clients and it was hard to deal with people cancelling on me, even though I know it was not my fault, just put enormous pressure on me because I have a big dream and all these failures make me feel like I cant even do small simple stuff let alone achieve big dreams and my depressive thoughts just make the whole situation worse. Then the panic attacks started, every morning it was hard to breathe for a couple of hours because of the stress of having the operate the business and losing clients and stress about the future. Now, everyone, I worked so hard to rebook is cancelling too, I know a real business person would actively solve the problem and I eventually will but, I don't know, I still feel like I need some support.

So I guess my question is, how have you guys dealt with work stress and these nagging depressive thoughts that make you want to give up every day?

I also accept motivational cuddles :)
 

Paisley

* * *
SF Artist
SF Supporter
#3
Think I read somewhere that business owners have a way higher rate of mental illness than the average person, I imagine largely due to the stress over having so much responsibility placed on you.

I'm no entrepreneur but my advice would be that if you're able to, make sure to take a bit of time for yourself, so that when you do go back to tackling these problems you'll be approaching it with a more level head.
 

HappyKitty

•✮• SF's pet kitty •✮•
#4
Hai. I think everyone here deals with the same thing, if negative thoughts rises just because of those then like @Paisley said, I suggest you take a break. Its never good to force yourself for it to succeed or do too much in one go at once.But from my experience, I deal with it by telling myself that ‘we can’t avoid hardships. just that not all troubles are worth dealing with.’ And I hope you can try to do networking to get more clients if you’re doing this. - just my 2 cents.
 

Shannew

Well-Known Member
#6
Think I read somewhere that business owners have a way higher rate of mental illness than the average person, I imagine largely due to the stress over having so much responsibility placed on you.

I'm no entrepreneur but my advice would be that if you're able to, make sure to take a bit of time for yourself, so that when you do go back to tackling these problems you'll be approaching it with a more level head.
Yeah youre right paisley! I have a new rule now - my mental health over everything and anything. I'm trying to take it easy today. Thanks for the advice :)

I wish I could go back to that time when barely anything affected me... maybe one day :)
 

Shannew

Well-Known Member
#7
Hai. I think everyone here deals with the same thing, if negative thoughts rises just because of those then like @Paisley said, I suggest you take a break. Its never good to force yourself for it to succeed or do too much in one go at once.But from my experience, I deal with it by telling myself that ‘we can’t avoid hardships. just that not all troubles are worth dealing with.’ And I hope you can try to do networking to get more clients if you’re doing this. - just my 2 cents.
Hii kitty :)
Thanks for the advice! You're right I'm not gonna overdo it anymore, if I need a break I'll take one and try to work on fixing the problems practically than getting emotional, that's always been a weakness of mine :D
 

Shannew

Well-Known Member
#8
Hi guys thanks so much for the advice, feeling much loved and supported now :)

I'm just going to write a list of things that I need to work on and I'm not going to go back to my business until I've organised them :)
1. Journal my feelings every day
2. Get into an exercise routine, nothing hard at least some cardio every day
3. Start my meds
4. Organize a chat with a psychologist
5. A therapy dog that gives good cuddles
6. Weekly meditation class
7. No more junk food
8. Last two hours of the day is free time/SF time

Ok lets go! :)
 

Sunspots

★☆ Comfortably Sunny☆★
Staff member
Safety & Support
SF Supporter
#9
I had my own business before my brain went wonky. I ran a childcare business of after school and breakfast clubs in several local schools. I had over 300 children on my registers. Dealing with all the invoicing to parents, chasing up when they didn't pay their bills, looking after the 27 staff, liaising with the schools and all the red tape around childcare and schools. It was ok when it was just one or two clubs but as the business grew it became more and more stressful. In the end it became too much. I'm not sure if that added to my depression or I just couldn't cope with it because of my depression. But I knew I couldn't continue with it.
I'd set it up as "not for profit" community interest company, paying myself a small salary and putting the remaining profits into staff training, equipment and any left over would be donated to local causes. I had a small committee of parents to help make decisions about donations and I handed the company over to them, making them directors.

Three years on I do regret that decision. I should have taken a step back rather than totally leave it.

At the end of the day, your health has to come first. If there's a way to step back for a while or to downsize the business so it becomes less stressful it's probably a good thing.
 

Shannew

Well-Known Member
#10
I had my own business before my brain went wonky. I ran a childcare business of after school and breakfast clubs in several local schools. I had over 300 children on my registers. Dealing with all the invoicing to parents, chasing up when they didn't pay their bills, looking after the 27 staff, liaising with the schools and all the red tape around childcare and schools. It was ok when it was just one or two clubs but as the business grew it became more and more stressful. In the end it became too much. I'm not sure if that added to my depression or I just couldn't cope with it because of my depression. But I knew I couldn't continue with it.
I'd set it up as "not for profit" community interest company, paying myself a small salary and putting the remaining profits into staff training, equipment and any left over would be donated to local causes. I had a small committee of parents to help make decisions about donations and I handed the company over to them, making them directors.

Three years on I do regret that decision. I should have taken a step back rather than totally leave it.

At the end of the day, your health has to come first. If there's a way to step back for a while or to downsize the business so it becomes less stressful it's probably a good thing.
Sunspots you have given me the best advice, thank you so much, this is exactly what I needed to hear.

What you did was amazing, I can only imagine the pressure you were under at the cusp of it all, and you did it all as a charity, how amazing. You're right taking a break is better than freaking out and giving it all up. I'm not going to die if I lose a few potential clients and I can always make it up later when I feel better.

Thanks again :)

What do you do as work now if you don't mind me asking?
 

Sunspots

★☆ Comfortably Sunny☆★
Staff member
Safety & Support
SF Supporter
#11
What do you do as work now if you don't mind me asking?
I haven't worked since (that was three years ago). But I'm ready to find something part time now. Something I can come home and forget about. I've got my eye on a lovely farm shop and cafe up the road. The staff always look like they're enjoying themselves so I'm hoping a job comes up there.
 

Shannew

Well-Known Member
#12
I haven't worked since (that was three years ago). But I'm ready to find something part time now. Something I can come home and forget about. I've got my eye on a lovely farm shop and cafe up the road. The staff always look like they're enjoying themselves so I'm hoping a job comes up there.
Wow, that sounds so pleasant! It's actually crazy I've always wanted to just run away to a quiet town work in a friendly cafe. I hope you get to do it!
 

Dani24

Well-Known Member
#13
Hi guys, I've been feeling very overwhelmed in the last few weeks. I started a skin treatment business about 6 weeks ago. It was going great, I had a decent number of people in, then my area became a hotspot and business went down. I had a few bad experiences with clients and it was hard to deal with people cancelling on me, even though I know it was not my fault, just put enormous pressure on me because I have a big dream and all these failures make me feel like I cant even do small simple stuff let alone achieve big dreams and my depressive thoughts just make the whole situation worse. Then the panic attacks started, every morning it was hard to breathe for a couple of hours because of the stress of having the operate the business and losing clients and stress about the future. Now, everyone, I worked so hard to rebook is cancelling too, I know a real business person would actively solve the problem and I eventually will but, I don't know, I still feel like I need some support.

So I guess my question is, how have you guys dealt with work stress and these nagging depressive thoughts that make you want to give up every day?

I also accept motivational cuddles :)
I deal with it by running. Depressive thoughts is another challenge. I try not to stay in bed all day , but when I do I watch a comedy.*sadhug
 

Ash600

✮☆Meetup star ☆✮
SF Creative
SF Supporter
#17
For around 20 yrs, I ran my own pharmacy business, at one stage I had two pharmacies under my belt. The first few years were hard going but that was expected. However, as time progressed, I found the pressure just increasing due to various work-related factors. With reduction in overall funding and an ever inceasing amount of bureacratic red tape to negotiate, the work output had to increase at least two fold just to stand still. The expectations across the board were just getting ridiculous.

Now part of my problem, was that I tended to micromanage which was probably my down fall. I used to pull 9.5 hr shifts at work for 6 days a week, often followed by 1-2 hrs when I got home doing paperwork. Usually the odd or so would be spent on a Sunday also. This was going on for f##k knows how many years, there was around a period of around 8 yrs where the only "break" I would take would've been Sundays and National Bank Holidays. Eventually it all took it's toll, so I finally decided to take action.....

The thing is, which has already been mentioned here, is that it is vitality important to to be able to step back once in a while so as to grab your breath and be able to recharge yourself both mentally and physically. If you have staff, then delegate more, train them up if need be so they can take on more responsibilites and reduce the pressure on you.

Just being able to get away from the business for even the odd day a week can potentially be so beneficial. Even if it means you're not open on a particular day, then so be it, (for the time being at least). The worst thing is falling into the trap which I found myself in which was to practically eat,live and breathe work 24/7.

Making time to step back and switch off can make such a profound difference @Shannew
 

Shannew

Well-Known Member
#19
Impractical jokers
the office
For around 20 yrs, I ran my own pharmacy business, at one stage I had two pharmacies under my belt. The first few years were hard going but that was expected. However, as time progressed, I found the pressure just increasing due to various work-related factors. With reduction in overall funding and an ever inceasing amount of bureacratic red tape to negotiate, the work output had to increase at least two fold just to stand still. The expectations across the board were just getting ridiculous.

Now part of my problem, was that I tended to micromanage which was probably my down fall. I used to pull 9.5 hr shifts at work for 6 days a week, often followed by 1-2 hrs when I got home doing paperwork. Usually the odd or so would be spent on a Sunday also. This was going on for f##k knows how many years, there was around a period of around 8 yrs where the only "break" I would take would've been Sundays and National Bank Holidays. Eventually it all took it's toll, so I finally decided to take action.....

The thing is, which has already been mentioned here, is that it is vitality important to to be able to step back once in a while so as to grab your breath and be able to recharge yourself both mentally and physically. If you have staff, then delegate more, train them up if need be so they can take on more responsibilites and reduce the pressure on you.

Just being able to get away from the business for even the odd day a week can potentially be so beneficial. Even if it means you're not open on a particular day, then so be it, (for the time being at least). The worst thing is falling into the trap which I found myself in which was to practically eat,live and breathe work 24/7.

Making time to step back and switch off can make such a profound difference @Shannew
Hi Ash, thanks for sharing, that's some really helpful advice. I can't imagine the stress and toll that must have had on you. You're right I need to have a plan to reduce as much stress on me as possible and take some time out.

Can I ask if you don't mind, what motivated you to work so hard, why did you continue for 20 years? Looking back would you have done it again? Was the work fulfilling in the long run?
 

Ash600

✮☆Meetup star ☆✮
SF Creative
SF Supporter
#20
Can I ask if you don't mind, what motivated you to work so hard, why did you continue for 20 years? Looking back would you have done it again? Was the work fulfilling in the long run?
Sure you can ask, no worries...

What motivated me? - Initially, it was something which I enjoyed doing, but also with it being my own business, there was that added impetus to make it work. My thinking was if I wasn't going to put a shift in, then who would? In my case though, I probably took that to the extreme. The various responsibilities was another driving factor, failing to deliver and what consequences that could entail was not really on the agenda. Looking back, I guess doing what I did became more or less a routine where I used to plan out (mentally) what work I needed to do and when during the course of a week/month. So doing that for around 20 years just became second nature.

Looking back would I have done it again? Taking into account what I know now and also the current climate within the pharmacy sector, the answer would be no. That would also be the view of the majority of pharmacists out there as well no doubt due to varying work place pressures.. I was fortunate as for once I timed things right and got out just at the righ time. I now only do a few days a week at my old pharmacy. Considering I began working in pharmacies when I was a teenager, I've got over 30yrs experience in the sector. I've seen a lot of things and witnessed a hell of a lot of changes, some good, but some totally arsebrained. I suppose one thing I would've done different was to delegate more and even employ a pharmacy manager to help take the load off.

In terms of fulfillment, amongst all the stresses and strains and frustrations experienced, it did have it's moments bringing bouts of satisfaction, along with a few "stories" some of which have been posted with amusement to others in my diary here *bleh. Financially, I did ok, it provided a living and also means I can now take things easy.
So from a financial aspect and what I achieved workwise, yes I suppose you can say in the long run it was fulfilling.
 

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