Is it still hallucinating if you know it's not real?

Discussion in 'I Have a Question...' started by PiecesMended, Sep 24, 2011.

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  1. PiecesMended

    PiecesMended Well-Known Member

    So just wondering because I've had a pretty bad day. To the point that I walked downstairs holding a shoe because I thought there was a bug in it (I felt it, saw it then it wouldn't come out so I wanted to see if my mum could see it. She couldn't.) I also saw something in the tree outside my window and for a while I thought that there was something living in it. :unsure: I also had to cover the cam on my laptop by sticking a guitar pick over it because I thought someone was watching me. Now I think there's a woman watching me from a window in the flats across from me. I kind of know that she's not really there but I still think that she is... If that makes sense? I mean to a certain extent I know none of it is real... But I kind of believe it at the same time. At least enough for it to bother me and get me all paranoid and whatnot. Is it still a 'real' problem even though I'm sort of aware that it's in my head? I'm confused...
    Sorry, I think I dragged that out a bit too much. I don't feel 100% 'with it' right now so sorry if it makes no sense.
     
  2. AlienBeing

    AlienBeing Well-Known Member

    I was talking about this a few weeks ago with a psych nurse who used to work in an early intervention for psychosis program. I mentioned that I thought the people I talked to on forums who knew they were hallucinating seemed more sane than those who didn't and asked if it makes a difference in terms of diagnosis. He said it did not, that both kinds of people are psychotic. He said the difference between them is in the amount of "insight" they have. Insight is a psychiatric term that sort of means one's ability to know that one is ill and in need of help and treatment. Those without insight can be very diificult to help and treat so I guess knowing you are psychotic improves your prognosis or chance of recovery but doesn't change the fact that it's psychosis. Does that make sense?
     
  3. PiecesMended

    PiecesMended Well-Known Member

    To be honest I'm having trouble understanding anything at the moment but that makes sense. Last time I was seen by a mental health professional I was told that I was at risk of developing psychosis but nothing was really said about it and I was dismissed by the team at the beginning of the year. I have an appt. on Monday though. But it always seemed to me that if you knew you had a problem then you don't have a problem. If I remember correctly that's pretty much what they said to me.
     
  4. AlienBeing

    AlienBeing Well-Known Member

    I believe I've heard something to that effect as well from my support worker, but he's not as trained and educated in it as the nurse. I see my support worker on Wednesday I could ask him again. I also have a GP/psychotherapist I could ask, but I don't see him for a couple weeks. At the very least you have the "prodromal" or beginning symptoms of schizophrenia. I've had those too though and have never developed it. I have Borderline Personality Disorder. Transient psychosis is, I believe, no longer part of the syndrome, but it used to be. I get what I call "illusions" on the rare occasion. Pictures on the wall appear to come to life, typed words float off pages, plants seem to grow out of carpets, objects seem "unsolid" or unreal, things like that. I've never been put on anti-psychotics for such transient things though. Feelings of paranoia could be more serious though and you should probably talk to someone about it.
     
  5. Aaron

    Aaron Well-Known Member

    I have regular hallucinations....My dead father and brother also figures from history, Hitler, Napoleon and a few others but I know they can't be real, I sometimes think they may be ghosts but I have absolutely no fear of them.
     
  6. AlienBeing

    AlienBeing Well-Known Member

    I was just reading about prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia in "Clinical Psychiatry News". They've found that 15-35% of people exhibiting prodromal symptoms go on to have full blown schizophrenia. They've been studying ways to prevent it from happening too. They've found that giving antidepressants works better than giving antipsychotics. And the main reason I'm writing this is that they've found very significant effects in giving Omega-3 fatty acids. This is fish oil. It's frequently used along with antidepressants as it's known to improve brain health by reducing inflammation. Much of the brain is in fact made up of omega-3-fatty acids. I suggest you take a formula that has 1500 mg of EPA since some people don't convert the DHA of fish oil into EPA very well and EPA is what you need. An excellent brand recommended by my own doctor is Omega-3 Plus Joy. I take 3 capsules a day to get the 1500 mg. Here's an excerpt I just read:

    "High-risk subjects were identified and randomly assigned to receive placebo or 3-omega fatty acids for 12 weeks. Transition to psychosis, and symptom and functional status were evaluated over the following 40 weeks.

    Investigators found that a psychotic disorder emerged in 27.5% of the placebo group, but only 4.9% of the experimental therapeutic group. Symptom status and functional outcomes also were statistically superior for the 3-omega fatty acid cohort. The fact that 12 weeks of treatment provided protection for the subsequent 40 weeks raises the possibility of a critical point for preventive intervention."


    So there you go. Get some fish oil and maybe the symptoms will go away.
     
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