"It's more easy for an Excon to get a Job than someone with known bad Mental Health"

Discussion in 'Soap Box' started by Underground, Dec 25, 2010.

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  1. Underground

    Underground Well-Known Member

    This quote is from someone I had a forum debate about (on suicide) a few years ago. That's what she said, basically. At the time, I thought it was nonsense, but now come to think of it.. it might actually be true.

    On another forum (yes I've been a member of way too many) I read about the experiences of a few people that have been sectioned (either properly by a hospital or detained by police), and I was shocked at a few of them that said such details have turned up in great detail on CRB checks and other vetting processes in other countries thus deterring good employers from taking them on. Not only through that, but sometimes you have to declare certain mental illnesses for many types of employment. There are some careers that have reasonable demands for good mental health. For example, a pilot with paranoid schizophrenia might be a risk because of hallucinations. The military, etc. the same. But people that are knowingly mentally ill are sometimes rejected from occupations where their mental health is of little relevence, because it's seen as a 'black mark'.

    Then you have criminal records. If you have a serious criminal record, sure it's a sucker, but anything small or mediocre, and it disappears from your records after a few years, and in the USA, it can be expunged if it's minor (I think) and it's illegal for employers to ask. Plus even if you have an unspent record, it's likely that employers would prefer you to someone who is mentally ill. Perhaps expecting people with things like depression to be too untrustworthy, etc.

    So waffling on a bit.. what is your opinion? Possibly experiences?
     
  2. Kaos General

    Kaos General Well-Known Member

    Re: "It's more easy for an Excon to get a Job than someone with known bad Mental Heal

    I have bi-polar disorder and 162 previous convictions so i know for a fact it has a bearing on you finding a job. Its more or less impossible for me to find a job with anyone.

    Everyone from the UK needs to know what they are doing with the CRB checks. At the moment they are reviewing it and the likely outcome is only the enhanced disclosure will remian due to how much it actually costs to do a standard and basic disclosure so hopefully soon people with mental health problems will find it easier to find a job.

    Here:

    http://www.isa-gov.org.uk/
     
  3. Mikeintx

    Mikeintx Well-Known Member

    Re: "It's more easy for an Excon to get a Job than someone with known bad Mental Heal

    I havn't seen it be an issue in the US as medical records are confidential and protected information. The only time it may affect your job is if you join the military, police, or any other type of very high stress position such as those. I work with a few people with bipolar and try to accomdate them the best I can, as long as it does effect job performace too much it shoulnd't be an issue.
     
  4. Underground

    Underground Well-Known Member

    Re: "It's more easy for an Excon to get a Job than someone with known bad Mental Heal

    Not trying to sound dumb or anything, but I don't get it? S: The enhanced disclosure is the one which makes things difficult for people with a record of bad mental health, and it says on that link they're talking about extending them (well, it has been done already) and making it an offence for people banned from working with children/vulnerable adults to apply for such a position or for anybody to take them on.

    Unless I've missed your point completely, doesn't that make things a bit worse?
     
  5. CatherineC

    CatherineC Staff Alumni

    Re: "It's more easy for an Excon to get a Job than someone with known bad Mental Heal

    I have what's considered to be a very good job with a lot of responsibility. As part of that job I'm required to have very high Security Clearance. I've always declared my BiPolar Disorder and I've always passed the various levels of Security Clearance. Occassionally I've been asked if my line manager knows about my condition but that's all. I've answered yes and the clearance has gone through.
    Alternatively, if I had a criminal record (of any kind) then there's no way I'd be in the job I'm in now. I work in the UK btw.
     
  6. Crue-K

    Crue-K Well-Known Member

    Re: "It's more easy for an Excon to get a Job than someone with known bad Mental Heal

    Mental health 'issues' should only appear on an enhanced CRB check if the police were involved, i.e. taking you into a place of safety or removing you for a breach of the peace etc. Standard CRB checks should not show this. I

    If you have a serious mental health condition, you can state on an employment application that you are disabled and as such can be guranteed an interview and at this stage you can explain the circumstances surrounding the 'incidents' on the CRB.

    How employers view CRB information varies quite considerably. Also, it very much depends on the severity of the info on the CRB.

    On a personal note, I have been sectioned many times (and admitted as a voluntary patient), I have several convictions that have arisen from when I was having manic episodes and finally, most seriously, I was detained for 18 months at the State Hospital in Carstairs, Scotland for a serious assault (again, commited when having a manic episode). None of which has stopped me being employed as an university lecturer.
     
  7. Underground

    Underground Well-Known Member

    Re: "It's more easy for an Excon to get a Job than someone with known bad Mental Heal

    In regards to enhanced CRB's, that doesn't seem to be 100% true regarding the police. I have a friend that was sectioned under the Mental Health Act for taking a massive overdose and some other things, had no involvement with the police, yet it all appeared on his disclosure for a primary school placement. Enhanced CRB's don't only check police records, but sometimes other agencies too.

    Speaking of which, which fields ask for the enhanced disclosure, and which ask for the standard one? I sorta know that the enhanced is for close contact with kids and vulnerable adults, but aren't there other purposes which require an enhanced disclosure as well/

    Does it work this way in practice all the time, though?

    Damn. I take it all appeared on the CRB, though?
     
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