lexapro

Discussion in 'Therapy and Medication' started by twilight, Nov 28, 2006.

  1. twilight

    twilight Well-Known Member

    I just started taking this the 21st, 5mg once per day for social anxiety. My doctor said it is supposed to take away the "what if" feelings I get when I am around people. It's not working and I know I can't expect it to work already. I also have to set an appointment with a therapist pretty soon because I don't think medication alone will work. I need some advice on this medication. I think I might have some of the side affects (trouble sleeping, a little nausea.) Is it worth taking this or should I try something else? Has anyone taken this?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 28, 2006
  2. Syd

    Syd Guest

    Oh yeah, lexapro. I've taken that before, did absolutely nothing to help my anxiety. Your doctor sounds a lot like a therapist I had before. Let me guess, are you supposed to write out your feelings in a journal when you're feeling anxious, and does the therapist give you 'assignments' like visiting friends/ relatives, doing a job interview, and other social activities to make you realize your "what if" thoughts aren't true? Haha... yeah, it doesn't really work. At least, it didn't for me. My conscious thoughts weren't the problem at all, questioning situations and predicting bad events is just human nature and isn't really going to influence your actions that much.

    I've learned to be very optimistic on a conscious level, understand all the logic behind the fallacies of anxiety, and yet I'm still anxious. I've discovered it has more to do with the nervous system, I have many of the symptoms attributed to those considered 'Highly Sensitive People' and always have a certain tension in social situations. The tension I get around strangers is enough that I prefer being either alone or with a few friends, and it's not necessarily a bad thing. I can still be social when I need to, I just have more off-time in the comfort of my own residence to relax afterwards. I absolutely advocate living alone if you like your privacy, it's been awesome for me personally. If you think you'll get lonely or can't handle your own responsibilities well, then maybe having roomates or other company is best.

    My current therapist mainly listens, and allows me to find my own solutions rather than giving me 'assignments' or advising the psychiatrist to give me certain meds. I'm on no meds at all currently, and feel just fine. It helps to be friends with others who have dealt with social anxiety, depression, and other related issues. You'll have your good days and your bad days, and having close friends will help a lot on your bad days. Good luck with everything.
     
  3. TLA

    TLA Antiquitie's Friend

    Meds take time to be in effect for most people. A week is not long. Don't presure yourself.
    If you do feel queasy or other stuff, call the doc. All meds work different for ALL people. It is worth it if this is the first one you tried. I started with Prozac and now, am now on 4th kind.

    Yes, theraphy helps always!! meds are just part of it. You can figure out what is best to help YOU cope. There are about 7-10 popular, different methodolgy of helping you to learn about anxiety, etc. I say to seek someone that listens to you and shows they care. If you do not have that trust, you may not feel comfortable.

    Several great sites on google give you info. on several drugs. I have heard better things of Lexapro than for others. I took lexapro for awhile, with no prob and no side effect. Do not recall why I changed. Probably to one stronger.
    Good Luck!! If I find more links will post. :mellow:
    I copied this one for ya. Not sure if it will help.


    Forest Labs

    LEXAPRO (escitalopram oxalate) is a member of a group of prescription drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). LEXAPRO is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for both major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

    LEXAPRO has been prescribed to over 13 million patients in the U.S., where it is the fastest-growing medicine of its type.1,2 With just one 10 mg tablet a day, clinical trials suggest that many patients' depressive and anxiety symptoms begin to improve within a week or two after taking LEXAPRO. Full antidepressant effects may take 4 to 6 weeks.

    Lexapro is Well Tolerated with Few Side Effects

    LEXAPRO is a powerful medicine that is well tolerated. In studies of patients taking 10 mg a day of LEXAPRO, the number of people who stopped taking LEXAPRO due to side effects was comparable to those who took placebo [sugar pill] in the treatment of depression, and low in the treatment of GAD.3,4,5† If you think you are experiencing side effects, you should talk with your healthcare professional about your concerns. A simple adjustment in dose may be all that is required. The most frequent side effects reported with LEXAPRO are nausea, insomnia, problems with ejaculation, somnolence, increased sweating, fatigue, decreased libido, and anorgasmia.3,6 Patients taking LEXAPRO typically have mild to moderate side effects which tend to go away with continued treatment. One study of patients taking 10 mg of LEXAPRO showed that these side effects usually do not cause patients to stop taking LEXAPRO. In that study, only 4% of patients stopped taking LEXAPRO due to side effects, compared with 3% of the patients taking placebo.3,6



    How SSRIs Work

    The brain chemistry of depression and anxiety is not fully understood. However, a growing body of evidence supports the view that people with these disorders have an imbalance of the brain's neurotransmitters. These are chemicals in the brain that allow nerve cells to communicate. One of these neurotransmitters is serotonin. An imbalance in serotonin may be an important factor in the development of depression and anxiety. LEXAPRO appears to relieve the symptoms of depression and anxiety by increasing serotonin with minimal effect on many of the other chemicals in the brain.

    LEXAPRO Treats Both Depression and GAD

    If you suffer from either depression or GAD, you should ask your doctor about LEXAPRO. For most people, one 10 mg tablet a day of LEXAPRO controls the symptoms of either of these disorders.3,6 With a simple dosing schedule of only one tablet daily, LEXAPRO makes it easy for you to take your medicine on schedule and keep your symptoms under control.

    References: 1. Wolters Kluwer Health, Estimated Unique Patient Counts, March 2006. 2. IMS National Prescription Audit Weekly Report. December 2005. 3. Burke WJ, Gergel I, Bose A. Fixed-dosed trial of the single isomer SSRI escitalopram in depressed outpatients. J Clin Psychiatry. 2002;63:331-336. 4. Lexapro [package insert]. St Louis, MO: Forest Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; 2005. 5. Goodman WK, Bose A, Wang Q. Escitalopram 10 mg/day is effective in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. Poster presented at: 23rd Annual Conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America; March 27-30, 2003; Toronto, Canada. 6. Data on file, Forest Laboratories, Inc.

    IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION – Depression is a serious condition that can lead to suicidal thoughts and behavior. Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (2% to 4%) in short-term studies of 9 antidepressant drugs in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Patients started on therapy should be observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, or unusual changes in behavior, especially at the beginning of therapy or at the time of dose changes. This risk may persist until significant remission occurs. Families and caregivers should be advised of the need for close observation and communication with the prescriber. Lexapro is not approved for use in pediatric patients.

    Lexapro is contraindicated in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), pimozide (see DRUG INTERACTIONS – Pimozide and Celexa), or in patients with hypersensitivity to escitalopram oxalate. As with other SSRIs, caution is indicated in the coadministration of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) with Lexapro. As with other psychotropic drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake, patients should be cautioned regarding the risk of bleeding associated with the concomitant use of Lexapro with NSAIDs, aspirin, or other drugs that affect coagulation. The most common adverse events with Lexapro versus placebo (approximately 5% or greater and approximately 2x placebo) were nausea, insomnia, ejaculation disorder, somnolence, increased sweating, fatigue, decreased libido, and anorgasmia.

    Updated: Jun 26th 2006
     
  4. TheBLA

    TheBLA Well-Known Member

    I have been taking Lexapro for about a month, 10 mg variety. It hasn't given me any side effects at all, doesn't even feel like I'm taking it at all. Well actually, the first two days I took it, I got absolutely no sleep but maybe that was something else unrelated? After that though, no side effects or anything thank goodness. This is the first time I've ever taken any meds aside from the occasional cold medicine.


    Though I feel confused. At times I feel it does absolutely nothing and other times, I feel its definately helped me. Though I think for the times I was happy, it was only because I got a new laptop. Of course I am the biggest, most messed up loser alive so I have basically no faith in any medicine. :sad:

    Everyone has told me that you should wait at least two weeks at the minimum to see if it has any effect, so be patient, wait for a while longer and see what happens, nothing really will happen after taking it only for a week.
     
  5. AndyJP

    AndyJP Active Member

    Does Lexapro have a generic brand yet? I took it for awhile but it was too expensive, I am now taking Paxil. If the price isn't bad for you, keep taking it and give it a few weeks. If any side effects you experience aren't affecting you that much, don't worry about it. Also, side effects I've had with drugs would go away if I kept taking it. They may increase the dosage if you don't notice any difference, or might switch you to a different drug.