Moon wood

Discussion in 'Soap Box' started by me1, Oct 15, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. me1

    me1 Well-Known Member

  2. Chargette

    Chargette Well-Known Member

    Science can do all kinds of stuff now, can they trace what region the petrified wood came from?
     
  3. Zurkhardo

    Zurkhardo Well-Known Member

    As suspect as it is, it doesn't necessarily prove the moonlanding was a hoax. To quote one analyst, Paolo Attivissimo:

    "This may be a misunderstanding caused by two Dutch artists, Liesbeth Bik and Jos van der Pol, who organized an artistic event in 2006. This is where this “moon rock” first appeared. The event was very tongue-in-cheek, so maybe they concocted a fake "rock” and plaque to test the perceptions and knowledge of the participants, and then the origin of the rock was forgotten. There are quite a few clues pointing in this direction.

    For example, why would the plaque of a US gift have such very Dutch mistakes as “Apollo-11″ (with a hyphen) and “Centre” (British spelling)? Why would the US government give a moon rock to a Dutch politician who at the time had not been in office for over 10 years? Why give away a fist-sized moon rock barely three months after the first sample return and before Apollo 12 landed? Why was the rock shown for the first time in an art exhibition rather than a science exhibition?
     
  4. Robin

    Robin Guest

    I think the matrix is the real issue here and the machines are just taunting us with the truth, nobody could actually go from bill and ted to the coolest guy on the planet in real life :smile:
     
  5. aoeu

    aoeu Well-Known Member

    Well... there's actually no reason whatsoever to believe that this is the one originally given to Dees. For one thing, it's 1800x the size of the typical Apollo 11 moon rock. This story is much less interesting now that it's just turned into poor recordkeeping
     
  6. shades

    shades Staff Alumni

    Please........do you really think that Aldrin and Armstrong would give out petrified rocks to people/scientists/countries thinking that it would not be tested and subjecting themselves to ridicule and personal attack?

    Any possibility that they actually did give them "moon rocks" which were stolen by the recipients and replaced with a petrified rock?

    I think the former would be highly unlikely and the latter would be highly likely.
     
  7. me1

    me1 Well-Known Member

    It certainly isn't the story that convinced me that it is a hoax. I just thought that it was funny, so I posted it.

    The dubious 'science' behind the moon landing was my reason many years back now for doubting the validity of NASA's claims. I am sure you are familar with those claims but here is yet another article pointing out some errors. Strangely the author concludes that 'we' did go to the moon but, for some reason, NASA felt the need to fake all the available evidence. I do not understand the thought processes that would produce such a conclusion myself, but anyway, here is the piece:

    http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/4071/moon.html
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.