Musing from loneliness - Updates on my week without chat room.

Discussion in 'Rants, Musings and Ideas' started by Evanesce, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. Evanesce

    Evanesce Well-Known Member

    13 January here now, and the ban that I requested from chat room is starting to have the desired effect. My brain seems to finally be waking up to the idea that I need to get my assignment done by the 15th and it has no choice. Yes it is still throwing a hissy fit and doesn't wants to write but I have been trying to make it all morning, with brief breaks to come on here and look at forums. My essay is on animal assisted therapy. Looking into the benefits with 3 to 4 main areas. Prisons, healthcare, children and resthomes. It only has to be 750 words to 1000 words. I managed to pull off the pre-plan with a great result and I'm now kicking myself that I didn't dumb that down a little so that I could get some more feedback from the marking. Guess when someone is a perfectionist it's hard to do that and I'm still learning that I only need to pass not achieve everything. Pre-plan was 500 words and apart from needing to re-write the intro and the conclusion the body just needs adding too. Really annoying by the mark I got, 96%, and yes that sounds stupid, as most would be glad to get that. But the pre-plan was only worth 5% of my final mark and now I feel pressured and worried. If anyone has any suggestions let me know. Might even post my essay here for others to look at and give feedback. If that isn't allowed then the moderators need to let me know.
    Missing all my friends and feeling isolated at the moment, so if you end up reading all the, even if you don't have much to say would you mind just typing in Hi and let me know you have been.
    Thanks for listening to the rambling on a person on the edge of insanity over study.
  2. Evanesce

    Evanesce Well-Known Member

    The Benefits of Animal Assisted Therapy as a Complementary Intervention in Health and Rehabilitation.

    For centuries man has utilised animals for food, their skins and labour. But it is only within the last century, that man has begun to understand the benefits of using animal assisted therapy as a complementary intervention in healthcare and rehabilitation. In this essay, I will discuss some of the ways in which animal assisted therapy is improving quality of life in health care and the effects in rest homes and with children. Finally, I will discuss the improvements being made in prison rehabilitation using animal assisted therapy.

    Originally, animal assisted therapy was thought to not make much difference in healthcare. However, it was acknowledged that patients felt emotionally better. Initially thoughts were that this was only as a result of interacting with the animal and its handler. However, as scientific research has shown, animal assisted therapy has resulted in dramatic changes in patients’ physical as well as emotional wellbeing. “They had slower breathing, lower pain scores, and dramatically improved moods. People became less tense, anxious, angry, tired, depressed, and dejected after petting the dog” (Marcus, 2011, P.19-20).
    Animal assisted therapy is being used as a motivation for exercise, to encourage communication, and to help with lowering physical attributes like blood pressure, or breathing rates. Another primary function of animal assisted therapy in rest homes is helping with depression, and lowering anxiety among residents and their visitors. “Pet therapy plays an important role in psychological, educational and physical rehabilitation, and aims to improve the well-being of patients as a whole and improve their quality of life” (Moretti, 2011, P.125).

    It has been used both in hospitals, therapy and school settings with children and seen very positive results. Therapy dogs are being used in some schools with children who have trouble with reading. The dogs are utilized in very specific ways. Nervous children find reading to the dog provides less pressure and enables them to relax whilst reading, consequently improving their reading through repetition. Speech therapists are also finding the dog’s aid children by motivating them whilst they are learning how to pronounce words and learn to read. “Ironically, these animals may be able to offer children unique and valuable social and emotional support precisely because they are active and willing participants, but with the qualifier that it is outside the realm of their communicative abilities to verbally criticize or judge the child’s progress” (Friesen, 2009, P.266).

    Prisoners are being assigned a puppy to care for and train with very promising results. One such study found that it inspired many positive benefits and resulted in a reduction in reoffending upon release from prison. With the utilization of dogs in prison, improvements have been made with prisoners’ patience, parenting skills, social skills, self-esteem, as well as giving the inmates an opportunity to help others. “A dog training program in Wisconsin has had 68 inmates released who were dog trainers, and none of them have returned to prison” (Turner, 2007, P.42).

    My conclusion will summarise my main points and provide my stance, that animal assisted that has been found to be very beneficial as an aid to many aspects of both healthcare and rehabilitation. Despite the initial controversy surrounding the effectiveness and the benefits of animal assisted therapy it has grown in popularity and is now being used for many different purposes. Parish-Plass states “It is a tool that has spread in use with a number of populations, for example children, adolescents, the elderly, prison inmates, psychiatric patients, those suffering from autism or from chronic and terminal illnesses.”

    Proposed list of sources
    Friesen, L. (2009). Exploring animal-assisted programs with children in school and therapeutic contexts. Early childhood education journal, 37, 261-267. DOI 10.1007/s10643-009-0349-5
    Marcus, D. A. (2011). The power of wagging tails. A doctor’s guide to dog therapy and healing. New York, NY. Demos Medical Publishing.
    Moretti, F., De Ronchi, D., Bernabel, V., Marchetti, L., Ferrari, B., Forlani, C., ‘et al’. (2010). Pet therapy in elderly patients with mental illness. Psychogeriatrics, 11, 125-129. DOI 10.1111/j.1479-8301.2010.00329.x
    Turner, W. G. (2007). The experiences of offenders in a prison canine program. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from
  3. Evanesce

    Evanesce Well-Known Member

    Ok just under 15hrs left to go to get assignment done. Have managed to get it down to another 100 words needed and it's looking ok, after all I just need a passing mark right. Have to keep reminding myself of that so I do get it in. Managed about 5 hrs sleep last night and now my day has started. Kitties are fed, and it's humid here today. Body is complaining to no end today and pain levels are annoyingly high. Another two weeks until I have to money for the doctor again but I'll have to cope. Digestion is playing up and I ache all over today. Hard not to get negative like that but I'm trying.
    Missing all my friends in chat room. Wishing I could just say hi and see how they are all doing. Feeling incredibly lonely and distanced from everyone. Tried phoning my hubby's sister this morning and haven't been able to get hold of her for two weeks now. Getting a little concerned but not much I can do to find out how she is.
    So my day today is going to consist of finished assignment, little bits at a time, dealing with physical things and posting on forums. Hoping that some of the things I answer help someone. Just one person and I'd at least feel useful.
  4. jrp1991

    jrp1991 New Member

    hello, I am in a similar position I have lots of academic work to be handed very soon and have let the stress build up to breaking point where i am questioning my ability and choice of career. This entangled with an array personal and family problems has really made me consider just ending it all, hence why I'm writing this. i hope you are coping better than me x