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Orthostatic dizziness and exercise

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Innocent Forever

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#1
I know I started a thread on this here but I just can't seem to find it.... if you find it you can merge them together.

Do you exercise? How intensely? How shaky does it leave you after? Do you just continue to exercise anyways?

I've started running, couch to 5k. Every time after, especially now that the runs are longer, I'm left really shaky and usually rest for an hour, more like 2 or 3 with lockdown, after. Today I went on a walk straight after which was okay. Only wasn't okay when I stopped walking. Got dizzy only then.

It doesn't bother me. It doesn't worry me. I do hope to discuss it with my GP who isn't working with covid 19.

So until then I'd just love to hear whether you ignore it and exercise anyways, or not.


I haven't had the same reaction from lower intensity things like krav maga classes (well presumably neither is my heart rate in the maximim range for a while from that either).

@Sunspots @SillyOldBear @Walker
@everyone else who has responded to those threads that I can't find...
 

britishbloke

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#2
They usually say if any type of exercise makes you feel dizzy or faint to stop. Obviously walking isn't too strenuous of an activity but I would stagger the routine of the couch to 5k a little bit more than it is, if you continue to participate in it?

Do you keep well hydrated during activity @Innocent Forever ?
 

Innocent Forever

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#3
They usually say if any type of exercise makes you feel dizzy or faint to stop. Obviously walking isn't too strenuous of an activity but I would stagger the routine of the couch to 5k a little bit more than it is, if you continue to participate in it?

Do you keep well hydrated during activity @Innocent Forever ?
I'm dizzy afterwards, bot at the time. And no way of drinking whilst running :)
Though yes, I'm hydrated. If I don't drink enough I get dizzy so as a general I actually need to cut down on hydration...
 

Innocent Forever

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#5
Raaaaa. I'm thinking that maybe I should stop running. Running gives me a lot. It means I've had to stay committed to something. It's definitely given me more stamina. The main reason I was running was for the mental health benefits. I've only begun to see it now. I'm calmer when I run, although the okayness from it doesn't last.
I don't really know what to do and my GP ain't in surgery and the other is a waste of time.

Maybe also something with electrolytes could be worth trying to replenish the electrolytes lost during exercise @Innocent Forever
What are electrolytes?
 

britishbloke

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#6
Raaaaa. I'm thinking that maybe I should stop running. Running gives me a lot. It means I've had to stay committed to something. It's definitely given me more stamina. The main reason I was running was for the mental health benefits. I've only begun to see it now. I'm calmer when I run, although the okayness from it doesn't last.
I don't really know what to do and my GP ain't in surgery and the other is a waste of time.


What are electrolytes?
I mean if running does give you some good benefits, maybe stopping isn't the answer? Maybe cutting down to a level where it doesn't cause you any problems after, could be better?

Electrolytes are just like minerals we lose when we sweat (usually through like exercise), so it could be an imbalance that does this? Just a thought?

I hope you find some sort of answer soon! *hug
 

Innocent Forever

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#7
I mean if running does give you some good benefits, maybe stopping isn't the answer? Maybe cutting down to a level where it doesn't cause you any problems after, could be better?

Electrolytes are just like minerals we lose when we sweat (usually through like exercise), so it could be an imbalance that does this? Just a thought?

I hope you find some sort of answer soon! *hug
I think how dizzy I was yesterday scared me. Not from running. I originally planned on running today but now I'm just not sure.... I don't know whether it's harmful for my body to make myself shaky. I don't really think anything will happen whilst I run because it's only after that's a problem. Last time I ran it was after I stopped to stretch that the world was swimming, until then I was fine. That was 20 minutes of slow running/jogging so can't really cut it down more.
 

britishbloke

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#8
I think how dizzy I was yesterday scared me. Not from running. I originally planned on running today but now I'm just not sure.... I don't know whether it's harmful for my body to make myself shaky. I don't really think anything will happen whilst I run because it's only after that's a problem. Last time I ran it was after I stopped to stretch that the world was swimming, until then I was fine. That was 20 minutes of slow running/jogging so can't really cut it down more.
Hmmmm, I don't really know what to say other than maybe walking might be a better option really? I know it's not as fun but maybe could listen to a podcast/audiobook/music and it might seem like a good way of getting out and chilling for a bit of time?

Hopefully your GP is back soon and you can discuss it with them!

I hope you're ok *hug
 

tlaud

Well-Known Member
#9
Innocent Forever, I'll toss in some thoughts...it sounds like "jogging" is OK for you, but the "cool down" after is also important. Heart rate during aerobic exercise will vary based on the intensity, and a lengthy walk after gives our hearts time to shift from high gear to a regular level. Another concept is to gradually increase your running distance, typically 10% every week to avoid too much too soon.

Simple max heart rate prediction is 220-age, so a 20 year-old will max out at 200/minute, and from there you can pick low, med, and high intensity levels. In general, 60-70% is low, 70-80% is medium, and 80-90% is high. If I read this correctly, you said you can't drink anything while running. Consider the water in a small backpack container and use the hose to have a drink. Muscles require hydration to work properly.

Three components to assess are frequency, intensity, and duration. Examples are increased intensity should decrease duration, increased frequency should decrease intensity, etc. One example is baseball, with starting pitchers needing 4-5 days rest, and relief pitchers needing 1 day of rest after 2-3 days consistently pitching.

There is a lot more to say, so just let me know if you want to discuss this some more. My background is physical therapy, exercise physiology, and one marathon so I would know what runners are struggling with.
 
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