Questions about Therapists

Discussion in 'I Have a Question...' started by resistance, May 25, 2008.

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  1. resistance

    resistance Staff Alumni

    I know I really need some sort of help, but I have a few questions before I do anything...

    1) How do you go about getting a therapist?
    2) Do you have to pay? (Can you get it on the NHS? I presume you'd need to wait a while on a waiting list)
    3) Do you need to tell your employer you're seeing a therapist?
    4) Does it go on your medical records?
    5) If you decide to take your own life while you're seeing a therapist or after you've been to your sessions will everything come out of the can? (I ask, because there's some things I'd like to talk about which I have told very few people and don't want my family knowing).

    I'm in work at the moment, and I really don't want to be put on the sick or anything like that. Would this be out of my control? I mean, if I fess up to how depressed I feel will they tell me I need to go on the sick, even though work is one of very few things that's keeping me going.

    If anyone could answer, I'd appreciate it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 25, 2008
  2. Here...this link/thread might help you:

    http://www.suicideforum.com/showthread.php?t=30943&highlight=choose+therapist

    - Not knowing where you live, I'd venture a guess anyway that there are "sliding scale" services available (which depend on your income/ability to pay) - and for such, there may likely be waiting lists (though you can also ask to be put on a "cancellation list" - so if an appointment opens up, you'll get in far quicker).

    - No way do you have to disclose anything to your employer. And even if you were under their insurance/benefits - you would not be obliged to provide details. Nor would your therapist! Doctor/patient confidentiality is about as "sacred" as we can contrive in a "Big Brother" society.

    - Barring anything should happen to you (!), some details may be disclosed afterwards - but I'd assume that would only be in the case of you harming someone else (as in committing a crime), and not so much the details about yourself. However - I'm not 100% certain - so once I found someone suitable, I would discuss this particular issue with them, as they would be honest about specific things such as this. And it is, after all, only in your own best interest to be as forthright with someone who is there to help you and address all the things that affect you, or have affected you...

    Best wishes in your journey (it's brave to do this)...
     
  3. resistance

    resistance Staff Alumni

    Thanks for your reply, it was very helpful. :hug:
     
  4. You're welcome!! :smile:

    I only wanted to add that the only "justifiable" reason a professional would disclose anything to any authority (other than a crime) would be in the case that you expressed imminent plans (though not *merely* feelings) to harm yourself (suicide). In this, they are obliged by law to take action...
     
  5. Jenny

    Jenny Staff Alumni

    1) How do you go about getting a therapist?
    2) Do you have to pay? (Can you get it on the NHS? I presume you'd need to wait a while on a waiting list)

    You can find a therapist privately. Costs vary (I pay £35 for a one-hour session with mine) and some do operate on a sliding scale. A good website to look on is the BACP website Click Here There are lots of different types of therapeutic approaches, such as psychotherapy, humanistic counselling, cbt, psychodynamic therapy, etc so it may be worth researching a few of them to see whether one approach suits your needs best. For example the psychodynamic approach (based on Freud's ideas) looks more at going back to childhood feelings, etc. It looks at 'transference' that happens between you and the therapist and the aim is to work through it with the T. Something like cbt would look more cognitively at your thinking/behaviour and try to change things. Anyway, there are lots of links on the BACP website and it's probably a good idea to choose someone who is accredited with the BACP or the UKCP or similar.

    Yes you can get counselling on the NHS although as you say there is normally a waiting list. The NHS seem to be favouring CBT-type packages now as it's more of a "quick fix", i.e. it's short term, whereas psychotherapy is normally a longer term commitment. Of course the plus point is that the therapy would free.. the downside is the waiting list and also the number of sessions available. I once saw an NHS counsellor but it was only for 3 sessions. It was useful, but i was a bit careful in what i said because her (very brief) notes were given to my GP afterwards. You might want to check that out really.

    3) Do you need to tell your employer you're seeing a therapist?
    Nope.. i never have as I don't see what it's got to do with them.

    4) Does it go on your medical records?
    I guess if you were seen by an NHS counsellor then it would be on your medical records that you were referred to a counsellor, so in a sense, yes it would be. You'd have to check out how much your counsellor would then feed back to your GP about what is said in the session with her.
    If you went with a private therapist then even the GP need never know (unless your therapist needs to contact them).
    I'm wondering though whether you're feeling some sort of stigma attached to going to see a therapist - i just wanted to point out that seeing a therapist is ok.. and i think it's more common than a lot of people think. The fact that on your medical recoards it may say "referral to counsellor" it doesn't really mean much.. and if your employer somehow found out that you were seeing a counsellor, again it wouldn't mean much. I mean, people go to therapy for such a wide range of issues.. you do not have to disclose to anyone WHY you're going. And if they feel a stigma attached to going for therapy then it sounds like it's more their issue than anyone elses!

    5) If you decide to take your own life while you're seeing a therapist or after you've been to your sessions will everything come out of the can?

    The therapist will keep brief notes as to what is discussed in sessions and i guess every therapist is different in the things they record. I did read somewhere what would happen if the client dies but i can't seem to find the link now - If i find it i will post it here again.

    If I fess up to how depressed I feel will they tell me I need to go on the sick
    No counsellor should be telling you what to do. The whole idea of counselling is that you are the one in control of you.. the counsellor is there to faciliate the session and help support you. Sure the counsellor could suggest it but they would not have any power to make you do anything you don't want. Especially if you explained that work is the thing keeping you going, it wouldn't make any sense for them to encourage you not to go to work. Keeping active and busy would probably be encouraged, if anything.

    I think the most important thing is that all therapists do work differently and most private therapists should offer a free initial consultation session where you can go and meet them and discuss your needs and see whether they are someone you want to work with. It's a good idea in this first session to go with a list of questions such as these and find out what their policy is.. if you don't like the sound of their answer, find someone else :)
     
  6. resistance

    resistance Staff Alumni

    Thank you so much, both of you. Your answers have been very helpful and it has helped a great deal. I will check out the website you gave Jenny.

    Mucho hugs to you both. :hug: :hug:
     
  7. You GO, girl...

    :hug:
     
  8. BioHomocide

    BioHomocide Well-Known Member

    1) You have to seek one out.
    2) Yes you have to pay but if you have health insurance you should be mostly covered and only pay a small fee.
    3) No one needs to know.
    4) It might go into your records.
    5) If you are an adult anything you tell your therapist is on a doctor patient strict privilege. Your therapist can't tell anyone anything about what you tell him/her. If you are under age then they might/can notify your parents.
     
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