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Skyzotypal personality disorder

#1
Hello everybody..
I am a very confused person about who I am..what I feel..how life is supposed to feel...about the outside or inside world..
Since now I was sure I am a quite borderline, an avoiding personality disorder..anxious..who knows
Not long time ago, I took for curiosity a personality test and guess what..surprise..I had a high percentuale of this new ( for me) skyzotypal personality disorder .
There are not many information online..but looking at the diagnostic symptoms..it looks like I am there..
I wish to know if there is someone here who have it, who knows more about it...
I thought iso far I have a lack of social skills...but it may be a part of something bigger
I have also lack of online social skills ..but today I am brave..so here I am
 

MisterBGone

Well-Known Member
#2
Hi đź‘‹ AliceinWonderlannd! : )

I must admit, I had never heard of that before, but a quick search led to this from the Mayo Clinic (I always like the way in which they tend to lay things out — it’s very concise!) :^)
But before getting too carried away, it might be best to get a professional diagnosis from a medical doctor, or psychiatrist. It is tempting and easy to take these quizzes and everything else that’s at our fingertips nowadays, but there is a reason these doctors and such, have got to go to school and do all the many years of training in order to earn their degrees. It doesn’t take 20 minutes to figure it all out! Ha. ;) Anyway, glad to have you here, and hope you can find some peace and happiness—whatever else you may be looking for... take care of yourself!

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases...onality-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20353919
 
#3
Hi đź‘‹ AliceinWonderlannd! : )

I must admit, I had never heard of that before, but a quick search led to this from the Mayo Clinic (I always like the way in which they tend to lay things out — it’s very concise!) :^)
But before getting too carried away, it might be best to get a professional diagnosis from a medical doctor, or psychiatrist. It is tempting and easy to take these quizzes and everything else that’s at our fingertips nowadays, but there is a reason these doctors and such, have got to go to school and do all the many years of training in order to earn their degrees. It doesn’t take 20 minutes to figure it all out! Ha. ;) Anyway, glad to have you here, and hope you can find some peace and happiness—whatever else you may be looking for... take care of yourself!

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases...onality-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20353919
Yes...is true...it s also hard to diagnose it yourself. I have also studies on this field...but I can never understand myself..like I can't see myself...
Maybe there are others ...
But it s hard, because social skills are simple..that almost everybody avoid it....
 

MisterBGone

Well-Known Member
#4
Yes...is true...it s also hard to diagnose it yourself. I have also studies on this field...but I can never understand myself..like I can't see myself...
Maybe there are others ...
But it s hard, because social skills are simple..that almost everybody avoid it....
Yes, I agree with you! : ) And I think it is very hard to view things objectively, when it comes to self-diagnosis. This is where someone who works in the field for a living would come in handy, and hopefully do wonders for you. Because they can take the subjectivity, out of the equation, and try to help you as they formulate their diagnosis. : )

Anyways, there are a lot of overlapping features, or symptoms present in various disorders, and whatnot.

So, even when we want to go ahead and try to diagnose a friend, coworker, or family member, it is hard (not only if we are not professionals, ourselves), but because we will also have inherent biases and such, that may color or distort our points of view — in other words, steer us in one direction or another, based on our experiences with that one individual.
 
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MichaelKay

Well-Known Member
#5
Hi Alice.

As MisterBGone said the only way to really be sure if you might qualify for a diagnosis is seeing a specialist (psychiatrist or psychologist). I'd recommend trying that.

I'm diagnosed with schizotypal disorder (or schizotypal personality disorder as the Americans call it) and from my experience it can be hard to tell who might or might not have the disorder. I'm on the depressive/anxious/introvert scale of the disorder while others with the same disorder can have different symptoms. And a lot of these different disorders do overlap to some extent (ie can share symptoms) not to mention the chance of co-morbidity with other disorders (believe me, I've often wondered if I'm lowkey Borderline aswell). So it's always best to go to your doctor and getting a professional opinion.

I hope you get the help or answers you might need. (You're more than welcome to ask if there's anything specific about my disorder you want to know about but it doesn't say much about it in general because symptoms and experiences are so different from person to person).
 

Sevven

Well-Known Member
#6
I played the armchair psychology game for about a year before realizing, all the quizzes are just piecing together symptoms. So when I was feeling off I'd pull out my phone and log my symptoms in my notepad. After compiling a big ol list I made an appointment with a psychiatrist. I just handed her my notes and the instant she finished reading she asked, "Do you think you might be bi polar?"
I have a few co morbid diagnoses, but loggin ggv my symptoms is what got me on the right track. And started to figuring out medication.
 

MichaelKay

Well-Known Member
#7
I played the armchair psychology game for about a year before realizing, all the quizzes are just piecing together symptoms. So when I was feeling off I'd pull out my phone and log my symptoms in my notepad. After compiling a big ol list I made an appointment with a psychiatrist. I just handed her my notes and the instant she finished reading she asked, "Do you think you might be bi polar?"
I have a few co morbid diagnoses, but loggin ggv my symptoms is what got me on the right track. And started to figuring out medication.
40% of the time I'm constantly wondering if I have malingering disorder. If all the things I deal with are things I deal with because I was made aware of them or if they're "real". It's a mindfuck when you can spot your symptoms and name them and the inevitable question comes up; "If you know and can see this why don't you just change it?" .... as if you can think your way out of a depression just because you know you're depressed. Or realize your schizophrenic hallucination isn't real and by thought alone "cure" your illness. I wish it was that easy. I wish people would respect me when I tell them I spend a lot of time researching my own diagnosis ('cause god knows psychiatrists and psychologists just give you a diagnosis without telling you what it means or why they give it to you).

And "knowing too much" or have some kind of selfawareness is a red flag. But no one else wants to give me that knowledge so all I can do is educate myself on it. And that easily makes me seem like I'm malingering (ie faking) an illness because I can see and verbalize how my symptoms play out. I can't always stop it but I can see it in hindsight, why I do the things I do or why I react as I do.

But good luck sharing that with a psychiatrist and not making him/her thinking you're reading the DSM daily and try to "act like you're crazy without actually being crazy".
 

Sunspots

Pffffeckn amazin
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#8
I'm officially diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder along with BPD and Avoidant Personality Disorder. When I take those online tests I pretty much come out with everything so I don't take them very seriously.

I also very much query the schizotypal diagnosis (as does my therapist). Sure, I fit some of the criteria (pretty much every person alive will) but I don't think enough of them to have a diagnosis. But maybe my psychiatrist thinks differently. I don't get too hung up on diagnoses - they're just names and don't change who we are as people.
 

MichaelKay

Well-Known Member
#9
I'm officially diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder along with BPD and Avoidant Personality Disorder. When I take those online tests I pretty much come out with everything so I don't take them very seriously.

I also very much query the schizotypal diagnosis (as does my therapist). Sure, I fit some of the criteria (pretty much every person alive will) but I don't think enough of them to have a diagnosis. But maybe my psychiatrist thinks differently. I don't get too hung up on diagnoses - they're just names and don't change who we are as people.
Can I ask why you can't identify with the schizotypal disorder label? I find that most think it's about being eccentric and weird. But I have to disagree. It isn't just being weird or eccentric. It's just as much having negative symptoms like anhedonia, depersonalization/derealization, dysthimia, excessive mood swings (as in Borderline. There's quite the overlap there) and social "anxiety" (I've never seen it as actual anxiety. More like people around me stresses me out because I'm so selfaware all the time and can't relax, not even with a gf, without being alone).
 

Sunspots

Pffffeckn amazin
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#10
Can I ask why you can't identify with the schizotypal disorder label? I find that most think it's about being eccentric and weird. But I have to disagree. It isn't just being weird or eccentric. It's just as much having negative symptoms like anhedonia, depersonalization/derealization, dysthimia, excessive mood swings (as in Borderline. There's quite the overlap there) and social "anxiety" (I've never seen it as actual anxiety. More like people around me stresses me out because I'm so selfaware all the time and can't relax, not even with a gf, without being alone).
The criteria of symptoms is:

Symptoms
Schizotypal personality disorder typically includes five or more of these signs and symptoms:

1. Being a loner and lacking close friends outside of the immediate family.

2. Flat emotions or limited or inappropriate emotional responses

3. Persistent and excessive social anxiety

4. Incorrect interpretation of events, such as a feeling that something that is actually harmless or inoffensive has a direct personal meaning

5. Peculiar, eccentric or unusual thinking, beliefs or mannerisms

6. Suspicious or paranoid thoughts and constant doubts about the loyalty of others

7. Belief in special powers, such as mental telepathy or superstitions

8. Unusual perceptions, such as sensing an absent person's presence or having illusions

9. Dressing in peculiar ways, such as appearing unkempt or wearing oddly matched clothes

10. Peculiar style of speech, such as vague or unusual patterns of speaking, or rambling oddly during conversations

Me:

1. I'm certainly not a loner and have many close friends outside of my family.

2. I don't have flat or limited emotions. I guess sometimes I have inappropriate emotional responses but I think that's more to do with my BPD.

3. I don't have excessive social anxiety, not sure I'd consider myself to have social anxiety at all.

4. I don't consider anything to have any kind of personal meaning.

5. I don't have eccentric, peculiar or unusual beliefs or mannerisms. I'm pretty standard apart from self loathing.

6. I don't have suspicious or paranoid thoughts about people - friends or family. I only ever doubt their loyalty when I'm actively suicidal.

7. I certainly don't believe in any special powers.

8. I don't have unusual perceptions as a general rule although I have had short periods of seeing and hearing things that aren't there when in severe crisis.

9. I don't dress oddly although as a teenager I was a punk but soon grew out of it.

10. My speech and way of talking is entirely standard.

I honestly have no idea how she came up with that diagnosis.
 

Sevven

Well-Known Member
#11
40% of the time I'm constantly wondering if I have malingering disorder. If all the things I deal with are things I deal with because I was made aware of them or if they're "real". It's a mindfuck when you can spot your symptoms and name them and the inevitable question comes up; "If you know and can see this why don't you just change it?" .... as if you can think your way out of a depression just because you know you're depressed. Or realize your schizophrenic hallucination isn't real and by thought alone "cure" your illness. I wish it was that easy. I wish people would respect me when I tell them I spend a lot of time researching my own diagnosis ('cause god knows psychiatrists and psychologists just give you a diagnosis without telling you what it means or why they give it to you).

And "knowing too much" or have some kind of selfawareness is a red flag. But no one else wants to give me that knowledge so all I can do is educate myself on it. And that easily makes me seem like I'm malingering (ie faking) an illness because I can see and verbalize how my symptoms play out. I can't always stop it but I can see it in hindsight, why I do the things I do or why I react as I do.

But good luck sharing that with a psychiatrist and not making him/her thinking you're reading the DSM daily and try to "act like you're crazy without actually being crazy".
I could see that being an issue, since some disorders are hard to get recognized without a doctor seeing you mid episode. I wasn't exactly sure how to take your post, but I didn't mean the term "armchair psychology" in a rude or dismissive way. Just that it's more helpful to just notice your patterns and ask a pro.
Wouldn't it be nice if noticing our symptoms meant we could control them??
 

MichaelKay

Well-Known Member
#12
I could see that being an issue, since some disorders are hard to get recognized without a doctor seeing you mid episode. I wasn't exactly sure how to take your post, but I didn't mean the term "armchair psychology" in a rude or dismissive way. Just that it's more helpful to just notice your patterns and ask a pro.
Wouldn't it be nice if noticing our symptoms meant we could control them??
I didn't take your post the wrong way in any sense I hope. It was just this "armchair psychologist" I could recognize. Because I'm somewhat wellversed in therapy and psychology after years of treatment and my own curiosity. Not to claim I'm any sort of expert at all.

But if I go see a shrink and tell him/her about my symptoms I'd be hard pressed to find someone who doesn't think it all sounds a bit too convenient. That mentally ill people aren't supposed to be aware of their symptoms, how they play out or how I constantly miss the chance to change anything and just repeat cycles over and over again.

Mental health staff doesn't really trust "your perception". It's part of the stigma of being mentally ill. Yeah I might look normal and seem normal but someone knows better than me and I can't claim to be an expert on my own life because I'm probably just in denial.

So I have to play this game with shrinks, therapists and psychologists. Pretend I don't know what's what because the moment I start analyzing myself they'll claim I'm biased or people can't do that. Only they know what's up. But they never tell you. Nobody sits down with you and explains what schizotypal disorder is or how to manage it. You just find it on print as a diagnosis someday in your medical journal. Nobody talks to you about it. All they wanna know is if you made dinner for yourself every day of the week, shower every day, make sure to clean and wash your clothes and go to whatever social program the state asked you to go to.

No one sits down and explains to you what your diagnosis means. And even researching it yourself is seen as either being a contrarian or trying to fake it. So I'm left with social workers, shrinks, psychologists etc who thinks I have a condition but outright refuse to tell me what that condition is or how it shows itself. All they wanna focus on is everyday tasks that can get me back onto a jobmarket asap. That's it. They call me sick but leave it up to me to even try to understand what my illness is.

No wonder I can get afraid it isn't even true. Because no one wants to talk about it with me. The people I thought were there to help me was just there to give me a diagnosis. Help me gain insight? Nah....who cares.... Get him ready for work. Who cares what he knows or thinks about his disease.

I had to study myself to understand things. No one wanted to help me understand my illness. Even being interested in my diagnosis is seen as wrong and contrarian. Above my paygrade kinda stuff. It's sad. And it leaves me feeling lonely and betrayed.
 

Sevven

Well-Known Member
#13
I didn't take your post the wrong way in any sense I hope. It was just this "armchair psychologist" I could recognize. Because I'm somewhat wellversed in therapy and psychology after years of treatment and my own curiosity. Not to claim I'm any sort of expert at all.

But if I go see a shrink and tell him/her about my symptoms I'd be hard pressed to find someone who doesn't think it all sounds a bit too convenient. That mentally ill people aren't supposed to be aware of their symptoms, how they play out or how I constantly miss the chance to change anything and just repeat cycles over and over again.

Mental health staff doesn't really trust "your perception". It's part of the stigma of being mentally ill. Yeah I might look normal and seem normal but someone knows better than me and I can't claim to be an expert on my own life because I'm probably just in denial.

So I have to play this game with shrinks, therapists and psychologists. Pretend I don't know what's what because the moment I start analyzing myself they'll claim I'm biased or people can't do that. Only they know what's up. But they never tell you. Nobody sits down with you and explains what schizotypal disorder is or how to manage it. You just find it on print as a diagnosis someday in your medical journal. Nobody talks to you about it. All they wanna know is if you made dinner for yourself every day of the week, shower every day, make sure to clean and wash your clothes and go to whatever social program the state asked you to go to.

No one sits down and explains to you what your diagnosis means. And even researching it yourself is seen as either being a contrarian or trying to fake it. So I'm left with social workers, shrinks, psychologists etc who thinks I have a condition but outright refuse to tell me what that condition is or how it shows itself. All they wanna focus on is everyday tasks that can get me back onto a jobmarket asap. That's it. They call me sick but leave it up to me to even try to understand what my illness is.

No wonder I can get afraid it isn't even true. Because no one wants to talk about it with me. The people I thought were there to help me was just there to give me a diagnosis. Help me gain insight? Nah....who cares.... Get him ready for work. Who cares what he knows or thinks about his disease.

I had to study myself to understand things. No one wanted to help me understand my illness. Even being interested in my diagnosis is seen as wrong and contrarian. Above my paygrade kinda stuff. It's sad. And it leaves me feeling lonely and betrayed.
Fucking hell. Where are you from?
Maybe I got lucky, but the first psychiatrist I went to answered all my questions, was glad I had some awareness and did whatever she could to help me so long as I didn't try to talk about emotional stuff like she was my psychologist. Haha.
It is ridiculous that it's just all about making you a "productive member of society. " Fuck society. I owe no one anything.
 

Sevven

Well-Known Member
#14
I'm officially diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder along with BPD and Avoidant Personality Disorder. When I take those online tests I pretty much come out with everything so I don't take them very seriously.

I also very much query the schizotypal diagnosis (as does my therapist). Sure, I fit some of the criteria (pretty much every person alive will) but I don't think enough of them to have a diagnosis. But maybe my psychiatrist thinks differently. I don't get too hung up on diagnoses - they're just names and don't change who we are as people.
I agree that diagnoses don't change our identity, but for me at least, having an issue people have researched and treated means there are pre set ways of dealing with my symptoms. A baseline for trying to make things better, instead of improvising based on disjointed mess of issues I don't understand. Does that make sense?
 

Sunspots

Pffffeckn amazin
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#15
I agree that diagnoses don't change our identity, but for me at least, having an issue people have researched and treated means there are pre set ways of dealing with my symptoms. A baseline for trying to make things better, instead of improvising based on disjointed mess of issues I don't understand. Does that make sense?
Makes total sense.
Sadly here in the UK though there are huge biases to certain diagnoses. Personality disorders is one of them. The mental health services don't like them and you're much more likely to be written off as a hopeless case if diagnosed with one. The NHS mental health services are very bad at deviating from their set treatments. They treat the diagnosis rather than the patient as they expect all patients to react the same, despite the fact that we're all individuals with many comorbidities.
 

extraterrestrialone

hi, guess who... its me...
SF Supporter
#16
Makes total sense.
Sadly here in the UK though there are huge biases to certain diagnoses. Personality disorders is one of them. The mental health services don't like them and you're much more likely to be written off as a hopeless case if diagnosed with one. The NHS mental health services are very bad at deviating from their set treatments. They treat the diagnosis rather than the patient as they expect all patients to react the same, despite the fact that we're all individuals with many comorbidities.
I really think this happens in america too. I think it comes from an effort on the part of the providers to remain above it all. If a provider considers a patient as having a situation unique to the patient it immediately becomes evident that textbook scenarios and established diagnoses do not completely apply and treatment has to become unique to the patient. That puts the provider in the precarious position of having to try unique untried treatment which might violate supposed ethics, or protocol that would open up potential for lawsuits, controversy, etc which although might lead to groundbreaking and successful discoveries and treatments they think it's too much trouble when it is so easy to treat the patient like a person who is just a pain in the ass and refusing treatment or is simply untreatable.
 

MichaelKay

Well-Known Member
#17
Makes total sense.
Sadly here in the UK though there are huge biases to certain diagnoses. Personality disorders is one of them. The mental health services don't like them and you're much more likely to be written off as a hopeless case if diagnosed with one. The NHS mental health services are very bad at deviating from their set treatments. They treat the diagnosis rather than the patient as they expect all patients to react the same, despite the fact that we're all individuals with many comorbidities.
When it comes to Schizotypal Disorder the ICD-10 (every country besides America uses the ICD-10) doesn't classify it as a personality disorder but as a subcategory of schizophrenia or delusional disorder. Or as the ICD states;
  1. Schizophrenia, schizotypal, delusional, and other non-mood psychotic disorders

The DSM-V (the American Manual) calls it Schizotypal Personality Disorder and classifies it as a personality disorder.
 

KM76710

KM stands for Kangaroo Manager
SF Supporter
#18
I think lot of truth about it happening in America about personality. Other than being butt ugly diseases like high blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes the only I was ever diagnosed with is schizoid personality type and it is sometimes treated more as if the problem is with the person just not trying to fit in...we don't in people like my case.
 

MichaelKay

Well-Known Member
#19
I really like the DSM and American psychiatry in general. They are a bit more lenient about nailing symptoms down whereas the ICD is a bit more cautious about it.

But schizo-spectrum disorder don't go away. Some manage it and some don't. But it never disappears. Unlike Borderline we don't surprise people someday by going off the rails. They can often sense that immediately. Borderline, Bipolar and other personality disorders might come and go at times and in between the people seem fairly normal. Until they don't. But schizo-spectrum disorders are just constant. People can smell right away there's something weird about you. That you're too friendly or not friendly enough. That your social skills aren't up-to-par with what's considered normal. That there's just something strange about you.

Some days I envy schizoids because the generic interpretation is they don't crave close relationships. But schizotypals do. They are just unable to make it work/fulfill their desires in that regard. But then again, there's no reason to envy anyone anything. I know what I've got, who and how I am and I couldn't imagine it being any different.
 

KM76710

KM stands for Kangaroo Manager
SF Supporter
#20
I really like the DSM and American psychiatry in general. They are a bit more lenient about nailing symptoms down whereas the ICD is a bit more cautious about it.

But schizo-spectrum disorder don't go away. Some manage it and some don't. But it never disappears. Unlike Borderline we don't surprise people someday by going off the rails. They can often sense that immediately. Borderline, Bipolar and other personality disorders might come and go at times and in between the people seem fairly normal. Until they don't. But schizo-spectrum disorders are just constant. People can smell right away there's something weird about you. That you're too friendly or not friendly enough. That your social skills aren't up-to-par with what's considered normal. That there's just something strange about you.

Some days I envy schizoids because the generic interpretation is they don't crave close relationships. But schizotypals do. They are just unable to make it work/fulfill their desires in that regard. But then again, there's no reason to envy anyone anything. I know what I've got, who and how I am and I couldn't imagine it being any different.
There is much truth to that about schizoid personality type. Most people who are around me or have been in the past have always said: pleasant enough, jokes a bit, but never joining in or becoming part of the group so never being invited in. No sense of anything bad or dangerous...just nothing there for them to connect with. Outside of my immediate family there was only one other person and her family I ever had any kind of bond with and we both came to the conclusion that it was because she was Asperger's while I am schizoid. That lack of any type of really having connection with others was what brought us to get to know each other well. She had her family and during the time I knew her when we were in junior college in the mid 1980s I know from getting to meet and be around her family that I was the only person ever got to know during that time or that she ever introduced to her husband and children. I have had many people whether school over the years or coworkers just describe me as flat emotions, flat reactions, like feeling nothing or next to nothing almost like dealing with Mr. Spock, just calm with not much response about anything, robot like and more intellectual in dealing with happenings going on around me.
 

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