so whats the disorder called when you only binge...but don't purge?

Discussion in 'Mental Health Disorders' started by shona, Dec 5, 2006.

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  1. shona

    shona Member

    all the threads and posts talk about binging and then feeling discusted and purging. What happens when you can't purge?

    you get FAT.

    I have a terrible problem with food that is now turning into a double problem with alcohol. If i could purge i WOULD. I tried laxatives but i had a terriblly horrible experience and stopped.

    is there help for this? everyone says just cut down. HA it's like a friggin addiction. Like drigging or smoking. You can't just cut down. Food is in your face ALL the time.

    Anybody else here the same way?
    I'd like to talk.

  2. Allo..

    Allo.. Well-Known Member

    Yes and no.. I used to be REALLY bad and ate ate ate 24/7... now its not so bad, though i do binge a lot.. just have this huge moment when i cant stop eating tho im not hungry.. and i cant purge either.. iv tried, but couldnt do it.. once or twice i was told to do it coz i was sick, but couldnt.. then twice when i was struggling with eating i tried.. once was at school.. but i couldnt do it..

    I guess its good that we dont purge.. but its not great on the self esteem..

    Try setting yourself a number or calories that you have to try and stick to, or say "ok, i cant have more than ... for brakefast, more than ... for morning tea, ... for luch, ... for afternoon tea, ... for dinner, and ... after dinner" It doesnt ahve to stay exact, but it gives yourself a bit of a goal..

    Take care, Ally _%
  3. shona

    shona Member

    i don't know. I really wish i could purge. If i could control myself really, I would try. But it seems like there is NO self control.

    I've tried talking to my doctor but i'm beginning to think he's a quack.
  4. Terry

    Terry Antiquities Friend Staff Alumni

    Don't be taking laxatives, they upset the body's chemistry and can cause long term damage to your body.

    If you feel like binging, try to do it on fruit and veggies (yeah I know not quite the same as noshing down a load of doughnuts..but what the hey).

    If you've binged, go walk it off. Stick on your headphones, some boppy music and walk the calories off.
  5. Spikey

    Spikey Senior Member

    Hun, it's called Binge Eating Disorder.......... I got it
  6. shona

    shona Member

    Is there any help for it?
  7. Spikey

    Spikey Senior Member

    I haven't sought help but I suppose you could get professional help from a dietition
  8. lost soul

    lost soul Guest

    How Does Someone Know if He or She Has Binge Eating Disorder?

    Most of us overeat from time to time, and many people feel they frequently eat more than they should. Eating large amounts of food, however, does not mean that a person has binge eating disorder. Doctors are still debating the best ways to determine if someone has binge eating disorder. But most people with serious binge eating problems have:

    Frequent episodes of eating what others would consider an abnormally large amount of food.

    Frequent feelings of being unable to control what or how much is being eaten.

    Several of these behaviors or feelings:

    Eating much more rapidly than usual.
    Eating until uncomfortably full.
    Eating large amounts of food, even when not physically hungry.
    Eating alone out of embarrassment at the quantity of food being eaten.
    Feelings of disgust, depression, or guilt after overeating.
    Episodes of binge eating also occur in the eating disorder bulimia nervosa. Persons with bulimia, however, regularly purge, fast, or engage in strenuous exercise after an episode of binge eating. Purging means vomiting or using diuretics (water pills) or laxatives in greater-than-recommended doses to avoid gaining weight. Fasting is not eating for at least 24 hours. Strenuous exercise, in this case, is defined as exercising for more than an hour solely to avoid gaining weight after binge eating. Purging, fasting, and strenuous exercise are dangerous ways to attempt weight control.

    How Common is Binge Eating Disorder, and Who is at Risk?

    Although it has only recently been recognized as a distinct condition, binge eating disorder is probably the most common eating disorder. Most people with binge eating disorder are obese (more than 20 percent above a healthy body weight), but normal-weight people also can be affected. Binge eating disorder probably affects 2 percent of all adults, or about 1 million to 2 million Americans. Among mildly obese people in self-help or commercial weight loss programs, 10 to 15 percent have binge eating disorder. The disorder is even more common in those with severe obesity.

    Binge eating disorder is slightly more common in women, with three women affected for every two men. The disorder affects blacks as often as whites; its frequency in other ethnic groups is not yet known. Obese people with binge eating disorder often became overweight at a younger age than those without the disorder. They also may have more frequent episodes of losing and regaining weight (yo-yo dieting).

    What Causes Binge Eating Disorder?

    The causes of binge eating disorder are still unknown. Up to half of all people with binge eating disorder have a history of depression. Whether depression is a cause or effect of binge eating disorder is unclear. It may be unrelated. Many people report that anger, sadness, boredom, anxiety or other negative emotions can trigger a binge episode. Impulsive behavior and certain other psychological problems may be more common in people with binge eating disorder.

    Dieting's effect on binge eating disorder is also unclear. While findings vary, early research suggests that about half of all people with binge eating disorder had binge episodes before they started to diet. Still, strict dieting may worsen binge eating in some people.

    Researchers also are looking into how brain chemicals and metabolism (the way the body burns calories) affect binge eating disorder. These areas of research are still in the early stages.

    What are the Complications of Binge Eating Disorder?

    The major complications of binge eating disorder are the diseases that accompany obesity. These include diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, gallbladder disease, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

    People with binge eating disorder are extremely distressed by their binge eating. Most have tried to control it on their own but have not succeeded for very long. Some people miss work, school, or social activities to binge eat. Obese people with binge eating disorder often feel bad about themselves, are preoccupied with their appearance, and may avoid social gatherings. Most feel ashamed and try to hide their problem. Often they are so successful that close family members and friends don't know they binge eat.

    Should People With Binge Eating Disorder Try to Diet?

    People who are not overweight or only mildly obese should probably avoid dieting, since strict dieting may worsen binge eating. However, many people with binge eating disorder are severely obese and have medical problems related to their weight. For these people, losing weight and keeping it off are important treatment goals. Most people with binge eating disorder, whether or not they want to lose weight, may benefit from treatment that addresses their eating behavior.

    What Treatment is Available for People With Binge Eating Disorder?

    Several studies have found that people with binge eating disorder may find it harder than other people to stay in weight loss treatment. Binge eaters also may be more likely to regain weight quickly. For these reasons, people with the disorder may require treatment that focuses on their binge eating before they try to lose weight.
    Even those who are not overweight are frequently distressed by their binge eating and may benefit from treatment.

    Several methods are being used to treat binge eating disorder. Cognitive-behavioral therapy teaches patients techniques to monitor and change their eating habits as well as to change the way they respond to difficult situations. Interpersonal psychotherapy helps people examine their relationships with friends and family and to make changes in problem areas. Treatment with medications such as antidepressants may be helpful for some individuals. Self-help groups also may be a source of support. Researchers are still trying to determine which method or combination of methods is the most effective in controlling binge eating disorder. The type of treatment that is best for an individual is a matter for discussion between the patient and his or her health care provider.

    If you believe you have binge eating disorder, it's important you realize that you are not alone. Most people who have the disorder have tried unsuccessfully to control it on their own. You may want to seek professional treatment.

    Hope this helps xx
  9. shona

    shona Member

    Thank you SO much for that reply.
    It explains exactly what I have but have been unable to get my point across to anyone. I will print this off and take it to my doctor.

    Thanks again,
    Merry Christmas
  10. lost soul

    lost soul Guest

    hi glad it has helped.
  11. slim_to_none

    slim_to_none Well-Known Member

    i do hope you've saught help. binge eating disorder is nasty.
    take care of yourself hun.
  12. taffany

    taffany Member

    Wow you have hit the nail on the head for me. I have been benge eating for a very long time i am going to have the gastric by pass done but benging is a big obstical for me and no one i no really truly understands how i feel. I try and tell them and it is like they dont here me. When i binge i feel numb and then i ask why did i do it why cant i just stop any way thank you for this post it has made my day that there are others out there that feel the same as i do
  13. Just_Me

    Just_Me Member

    i had a problem similar that i don't eat all day and binge all night.
  14. brokenangel

    brokenangel Member

    ive been through the same exact use to be anorexic...and then it turned into a bing-eating was the worst year of my entire life...i ate 24/7 and i wuldn want to leave the house..i couldnt even look atm y self and wore baggy sweatshirts for preety much an entire year so i uwldnt have to look at how fat i had gotten..i gained 30 pounds..which sounds preeyt gross i know...but i was 85 now i realize that wear im at now at 115 isnt so was along way to get to wear i was u dont even how many nights ive spent crying..and how much time ive wasted...but i realized tht trying to continue to lose wieght wuldnt work the way i got over it was to jus eat enough calories so i didn go over...or to eat healthy for a while..cut donw on the junk alot of fruit and vegetables..u can preety much eat as much fruit as u want n not gain nething....alot of fruit actualy help u burn just try to eat normall..dont wry about losing weight...and i know thts hard and its not tht simple.......but its not about the wieght....its how u see urself..i dnt know how to help to be honest...cuz eating disorders r probably one of the hardest things to overcome. im sry u r one of the people who have to go through it...and i hope i helped in someway.
  15. darkcloud

    darkcloud Member

    HI I wish I could be sick each time I ate, but the problem with me is I love food, but my body has suffered, and I have suffered. I have taken to jogging because I found that the feel good hormones are pretty similar to the ones I feel after I have polished off a plate of yummy food. I have lost some weight but it has been a tremendous battle because I eat my emotions till I'm sick
  16. immure

    immure Account Closed

    i went through some different expressions of eating issues. it has been and takin alot of my energy for as long as i think i started formin the "girl" body i m a perfectionist and don t take light to my body changing even little bumps have caused a great deal of mental grief. but back to the food part. i gained alot of controle after i first of forced myself to put down my fork between each bite. drank a glass a water before a binge fest (big glass) and after. journeled the time i ate the activity i was ingaged in how my mood was what i ate how i felt after i just did like a chart and filled in the boxes so a line looked like this
    8 30 am gettin ready4 day/rushed/banana/tasty/ furfilled
    9 15/work/empty disalusioned/cookie cracker/bloated & guilty

    i did this for a long time and was able to conect the foods i prefered when i was angry or sad
    then i did reasearch and found replacements for them that where better. cause some foods promote happy hormones like bannanas so i would do these instead of the bag of chocolate. and while i was tryin to sort out my emotion food conection i started the healthy living practises. park farthest from grocery store walk briskly to the door that sorta thing. i would like to believe i have come a long ways and have less then 80 % the issues i had before from this form of coping. it took time though. and a life time of sayin i m worth it and so is learnin to surf with my grande kids. hope u all find ur will and way.
  17. ashla86

    ashla86 Active Member

    I have that. I know I shouldn't eat because I am just losing weight from when I gained a lot but sometimes I get so depressed I start eating and can't stop. Then I feel so guilty later. I have carrots and yogurt in the house now so hopefully when I get like this I can jsut munch on those. Lately since it's warmer out I've been walking a lot so when I get the thoughts to eat I just go for a walk. I seem to eat more in the winter then I do in the spring and summer so hopefully now I will be able to cut back.
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