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Study Identifies Social Connection as the Strongest Protective Factor for Depression

tlaud

Well-Known Member
#1
I receive email regularly from Neuroscience News about current research, and this study sounded like it had good reliable data based on the results of 100,000 people, not just a handful. Up front I will say that I do not condone nor deny the research ....... just sharing it for anyone who may be interested.

https://neurosciencenews.com/social-connection-depression-16834/


Here are a few points of interest from the research:

1) Social connection is the strongest protective factor for depression

2) Reducing sedentary activities and daytime napping could also help lower the risk of depression.

3) The protective effects of social connection were present even for individuals who were at higher risk for depression as a result of genetic vulnerability or early life trauma

4) Factors associated with depression risk included time spent watching TV


Results:
Numerous factors across social, sleep, media, dietary, and exercise-related domains were prospectively associated with depression, even among at-risk individuals.

Conclusions:
This study validates several actionable targets for preventing depression.
 

tlaud

Well-Known Member
#3
Auri, Thanks for your "thumbs up." It looks like nobody else is interested, but who really knows. If something isn't working right, I try to find out how to fix it.

Here's what happened at work last week. One woman said she had pain running south into her butt.....I offered my professional opinion as a physical therapist (27 years).....another woman (not a physical therapist) gave her a diagnosis of sciatica, so I just let them talk. I am scratching my head trying to figure out what little value science has to some.

Now if only there were a study on how to make friends.
Mr.notduck, Thank you for your wonderful, positive comment.
 

Mr.notduck

Well-Known Member
#5
Auri, Thanks for your "thumbs up." It looks like nobody else is interested, but who really knows. If something isn't working right, I try to find out how to fix it.

Here's what happened at work last week. One woman said she had pain running south into her butt.....I offered my professional opinion as a physical therapist (27 years).....another woman (not a physical therapist) gave her a diagnosis of sciatica, so I just let them talk. I am scratching my head trying to figure out what little value science has to some.


Mr.notduck, Thank you for your wonderful, positive comment.
I'm sorry. You put substantial effort into this post and I was in a really bad place. I didnt mean to be a jerk. This is good information im just a terrible person. I can report my comment to the mods if you would like it removed.
 

Aurelia

πŸ”ΆπŸ”Έβœ΄ πŸ‘‘ βœ΄πŸ”ΈπŸ”Ά
#6
I'm sorry. You put substantial effort into this post and I was in a really bad place. I didnt mean to be a jerk. This is good information im just a terrible person. I cn report my comment to the mods if you would like it removed.
There's nothing wrong with what you said. You were just speaking your mind. That's not being a jerk.
 

Mr.notduck

Well-Known Member
#7
There's nothing wrong with what you said. You were just speaking your mind. That's not being a jerk.
Sometimes speaking your mind is being a jerk. Just because i'm having feelings doesn't give me the right to hurt others feelings. He wanted an informed discussion about the benefits of having a social support structure and I gave him that. He has every right to think I'm a jerk. Because I was.
 

Aurelia

πŸ”ΆπŸ”Έβœ΄ πŸ‘‘ βœ΄πŸ”ΈπŸ”Ά
#8
Of course people who have a circle of friends are less likely to be depressed. But in all honesty, 100,000 people is technically a handful compared to the 8 billion people in the world. However, that's not to say that the study is irrelevant, or untrue, for that matter. But we also have to remember that having friends doesn't necessarily eliminate nor subside depression. Many people say that they still feel alone even when they're around physical company. However, generally speaking, yes, it's better to have friends than not. Isolating oneself isn't healthy by any means.
 

Mr.notduck

Well-Known Member
#10
Of course people who have a circle of friends are less likely to be depressed. But in all honesty, 100,000 people is technically a handful compared to the 8 billion people in the world. However, that's not to say that the study is irrelevant, or untrue, for that matter. But we also have to remember that having friends doesn't necessarily eliminate nor subside depression. Many people say that they still feel alone even when they're around physical company. However, generally speaking, yes, it's better to have friends than not. Isolating oneself isn't healthy by any means.
Yes, but i think its point was closer to people actively engaging friends, forcing yourself to be the one that calls and sets it up is more likely to make you less depressed. Taking control and action in your friendships. Not just having a circle.
 

Aurelia

πŸ”ΆπŸ”Έβœ΄ πŸ‘‘ βœ΄πŸ”ΈπŸ”Ά
#11
Yes, but i think its point was closer to people actively engaging friends, forcing yourself to be the one that calls and sets it up is more likely to make you less depressed. Taking control and action in your friendships. Not just having a circle.
Yes, I agree. But if you're always the one trying to set things up, that's not helpful either. Friendship shouldn't be a one-sided effort. It should be both parties who make an effort to engage in activities.
 

Mr.notduck

Well-Known Member
#12
In the conclision of the article it also discusses that it likely needs to be a part of a multimodal treatment process to be effective. As in being active with friends will help in concert with other treatments. Not as a stand alone solution.
 

Mr.notduck

Well-Known Member
#13
Yes, I agree. But if you're always the one trying to set things up, that's not helpful either. Friendship shouldn't be a one-sided effort. It should be both parties who make an effort to engage in activities.
I agree with that there needs to be mutual affection and drive to engage with each other for ot to be a healthy relationship, but when im depressed i know i find it hard to reach out to friends to hang out. I think that this is similar to the faking a smile and faking laughing can actually increase your dopamine levels and make you happier. That when It is the hardest to, thats when you should try to be the shot caller for your group of friends.
 

Aurelia

πŸ”ΆπŸ”Έβœ΄ πŸ‘‘ βœ΄πŸ”ΈπŸ”Ά
#14
I agree with that there needs to be mutual affection and drive to engage with each other for ot to be a healthy relationship, but when im depressed i know i find it hard to reach out to friends to hang out. I think that this is similar to the faking a smile and faking laughing can actually increase your dopamine levels and make you happier. That when It is the hardest to, thats when you should try to be the shot caller for your group of friends.
Right. It's not that simple for depressed people, which is why what you originally said was completely relevant and true. It's not only difficult for depressed people to get the motivation up to go out, but also to make friends in the first place. I know I sure as hell have difficulties with both.
 

Mr.notduck

Well-Known Member
#15
You spoke the truth. And you weren't demeaning or insulting about it. You shouldn't be so down on yourself.
Understanding people's inital wants and needs out of social situations is something that i have extreme difficulty with. It generally takes them reacting to my response positively or negatively for me to put together the puzzle. I should have put together that he wanted an educated discussion, rather than fart jokes. And I feel bad that my emotional intelligence seems to have hit that wall hard, I have troube seeing the first cogs motion... I'm not getting down on myself im admitting an area i would like to improve myself in.
 

Aurelia

πŸ”ΆπŸ”Έβœ΄ πŸ‘‘ βœ΄πŸ”ΈπŸ”Ά
#16
Understanding people's inital wants and needs out of social situations is something that i have extreme difficulty with. It generally takes them reacting to my response positively or negatively for me to put together the puzzle. I should have put together that he wanted an educated discussion, rather than fart jokes. And I feel bad that my emotional intelligence seems to have hit that wall hard, I have troube seeing the first cogs motion... I'm not getting down on myself im admitting an area i would like to improve myself in.
It's a matter of perspective, I think. I've replied in a similar fashion to threads before and the person was perfectly fine with it. Like I said, you were implying that it's difficult for depressed people to make friends. It's completely relevant to the topic, not a fart joke by any means.
 

Mr.notduck

Well-Known Member
#17
Right. It's not that simple for depressed people, which is why what you originally said was completely relevant and true. It's not only difficult for depressed people to get the motivation up to go out, but also to make friends in the first place. I know I sure as hell have difficulties with both.
Ya, but from a pure science perspective pretty interesting... laboratory test, went well. Field test, not so much. Good theory but just as easy as free climbing Devils Tower. Ya, some can do it but 99.99% of real people in that situation would laugh and say thats impossible.
 

Mr.notduck

Well-Known Member
#18
It's a matter of perspective, I think. I've replied in a similar fashion to threads before and the person was perfectly fine with it. Like I said, you were implying that it's difficult for depressed people to make friends. It's completely relevant to the topic, not a fart joke by any means.
It felt fart jokey and I'm almost positive I hurt his feelings. And in the end thats what is really making me feel bad.
 

Aurelia

πŸ”ΆπŸ”Έβœ΄ πŸ‘‘ βœ΄πŸ”ΈπŸ”Ά
#19
It felt fart jokey and I'm almost positive I hurt his feelings. And in the end thats what is really making me feel bad.
Not everyone will always be happy with what you say or do. But that doesn't necessarily mean that you were wrong or at fault. I'm sorry that you feel bad, but I think you're being way too hard on yourself.
 

tlaud

Well-Known Member
#20
You put substantial effort into this post.
I appreciate you writing back, and I see you have a kind heart. Your response in post #12 shows that you took a couple of minutes to read it. Regardless of what some may think, 100,000 research subjects is more than substantial, and has some merit. I was just reading the post "How often do you socialize in person?" Almost all posted that they rarely do socialize, with many responses. It surprised me, and that is a major component of the research I posted......that to get out and interact is good for people.

In research opinions are tossed aside, but your reply I quoted above shows me one thing only, that you took the time to read and understand, for which I thank you. Maybe we can chat privately if you are interested.
 

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