The extrajudicial execution of an American citizen accused of terrorism

Discussion in 'Soap Box' started by Prinnctopher's Belt, Oct 8, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

    Ron Paul on Anwar al-Awlaki’s Demise: ‘I Think It’s Sad’
    The State Column | Staff | Saturday, October 01, 2011


    Rep. Ron Paul (R-Tex.), a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, slammed Obama for Anwar al-Awlaki’s demise on Friday. While Texas Governor and GOP candidate Rick Perry cheered the attack on Awlaki, Paul was highly critical of the US’s role in Awlaki’s demise.

    As quoted in The Los Angeles Times, Paul told reporters at a campaign stop at Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire that Awlaki’s demise demands serious reflection from Americans. “I don’t think that’s a good way to deal with our problems,” Paul said.

    During a videotaped message, Paul pointed out that Awlaki “was never tried or charged for any crimes. No one knows if he killed anybody.” The Texas Congressman added that “if the American people accept this blindly and casually that we now have an accepted practice of the president assassinating people who he thinks are bad guys. I think it’s sad.”

    Paul compared the attack on Awlaki to the trial and eventual execution of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh. McVeigh’s case was different, Paul posited, because he “was put through the courts then executed.” “To start assassinating American citizens without charges, we should think very seriously about this,” Paul argued.

    On the other hand, Perry had some kind words for Obama’s role in Awlaki’s demise. “I want to congratulate the United States military and intelligence communities – and President Obama for sticking with the government’s longstanding and aggressive anti-terror policies – for getting another key international terrorist,” Perry said in a statement.

    Anwar al-Awlaki, a propagandist and American-born cleric, was killed by a drone strike in Yemen on Friday. The drone strike was part of a CIA-US military operation that targeted the influential al Qaeda leader. Samir Khan, another influential propagandist, was also killed by the drone strike.

    CBS News reports that Awlaki had a number of connections to individuals who committed acts of terrorism in the US. Awlaki was in email communication with Nidal Hasan. Hasan was the US Army Major who killed 13 people at Fort Hood in 2009. Awlaki was also believed to have met with a few of the 9/11 hijackers.

    Awlaki’s demise is a significant blow to al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. For the US, it’s another victory in the war on terrorism. Despite the decimation of al Qaeda’s leadership, the lone wolf scenario continues to be the biggest threat to US national security. However, Awlaki’s demise will be a major blow to al Qaeda’s ability to reach out to young people.

    American-born, Awlaki used his familiarity with Western society to reach out to young Muslims. Fluent in English, Awlaki took advantage of YouTube to spread his message to his followers. Businessweek reports that Awlaki and Khan were able to “radicalize and recruit” Muslims through their magazine “Inspire.”

    Awlaki’s message on YouTube reached thousands of young people. Wired.com notes that despite the US government’s appeal to YouTube to remove Awlaki’s videos, some of the jihadist’s videos were still locatable on Friday.

    In comments made at Fort Hood, VA and reported by CBS News, President Obama said that Awlaki and Khan’s death “is further proof that al Qaeda and its affiliates will find no safe haven anywhere in the world.” Obama added that “working with Yemen and our other allies and partners, we will be determined, we will be deliberate, we will be relentless, we will be resolute in our commitment to destroy terrorist networks that aim to kill Americans, and to build a world in which people everywhere can live in greater peace, prosperity and security."


    http://www.thestatecolumn.com/artic...awlakis-demise-i-think-its-sad/#ixzz1aFTMqzoc
     
  2. Chargette

    Chargette Well-Known Member

    A lot of important points are brought up here. My question is: did the man denounce his U.S. citizenship? If he did that changes the story.

    If he didn't, what I want to know is: why was he not listed as wanted for treason?

    As I see things unfold, there are so many things that do not get addressed. But there are so many things happening that I think this spoiled U.S. population, who are so involved in themselves, that they are lost.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.