These things are in space, in OUR orbit

Discussion in 'Soap Box' started by Prinnctopher's Belt, Dec 21, 2009.

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  1. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

  2. Hache

    Hache Well-Known Member

    i think there is something stuck on his lens
     
  3. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

    LIKE WHAT? SPERM? :rofl:

    You and I know that is not dust.
     
  4. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

  5. Hache

    Hache Well-Known Member

    Until Pierce Brosnan kisses a dog with a human head their are no inteligent life forms out there


    It is all speculation and guess work, maybe one day we will find out what it is and the paradigm will shift
     
  6. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

    You do know that the universe is infinitely larger than just our solar system, right? I think it's negligent to believe there's no other intelligent life in the whole universe.
     
  7. Hache

    Hache Well-Known Member

    I think that aliens, spaceships and the likes are just the modern day witches, vampires and werewolves.
     
  8. Reki

    Reki Well-Known Member

    While our universe is constantly expanding and is certainly massive, it isn't actually that old. The chance of life taking root somewhere else like it did here is incredibly tiny. You could say it's a little conceited to think that we are the first to come about and are the only ones that have so far, but it's certainly a possibility given that Earth is only estimated around 4.5 billion years old and the universe around 13 billion. It's likely that more life will emerge before this universe dies but whether or not it's already here, it could go both ways really.
     
  9. nolonger

    nolonger Well-Known Member

    Kinda funny with all this global warming stuff to. Because apparently the sun will expand into a Red Giant and turn into a supernova and pretty much incinerate the solar system. Probly won't be around by then anyway lol. Oh and I certainly think that there could be life elsewhere. It'd be interesting to see what that NASA record that's flying in space has seen in a few thousand years. Imagine if something like that managed to get on earth...
     
  10. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

    How in the heck do YOU, the insignificant, young, naive human being who knows, really, not a damn thing at all in the scheme of the universe, like all the rest of us, say what the age of the ENTIRE universe is? We don't know how old the universe is. No one does. No one knows because there's no reliable nor certain way that humans could possibly determine it, even if they had 500 existences to determine it.

    Before the universe dies? We don't know whether universes are born or die or whatnot, these are just guesses. Just because OUR Sun and Earth are going to be destroyed, doesn't mean the whole universe is going to follow! Planets and stars are destroyed everyday. If nine grains of sand were stuck in a kid's pamper on a beach, would the planet where the beach resides go out of order?

    I don't think people have the capacity to comprehend just how incomprehensibly vast the universe truly is. The ratio of one grain of sand to this planet, is like the ratio of our planet to just the small nook of just our galaxy. I mean, we don't even have fully accurate scales to describe just how small we are compared to the whole universe. We haven't even been able to go far enough into space to even see what our galaxy truly is and photograph it, nonetheless try to venture to others. We have to make guesses using similarities we believe we have to others we can observe through telescopes.

    This whole solar system could explode in what we think is the most magnificent light show and devastation of all time; but it won't mean a god damned thing to 99.9999999999999988 percent of the rest of the universe. It would change nothing. It would be like a gnat coughing on a log in Miami, while you're in M50 3,000 light years away. We will be gone so fast, and all of these alleged accomplishments will mean absolutely nothing. All of this supposedly cherished history, all the remains of our ancient civilizations, all of the years, the struggles, the evolution -- will be gone, diminished forever to the space dust that birthed it. It will mean nothing. Not a god damned fucking thing.

    So where do we get off thinking that there's nothing else? Or even to think that there's just a "tiny" chance of there being any other life. That is just downright blasphemy.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 22, 2009
  11. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

  12. nolonger

    nolonger Well-Known Member

    In a way that's kinda depressing(meh doesn't change the situation :laugh:). We could just be completely destroyed and nothing will give a fuck(unless something is observing us lol). Everything we fight against in our daily lives, the mental and emotional struggles, the stresses and the anger. The happiness and the joy etc etc. And then it'll just be shitted over by what ever ganks our solar system. But I guess that'd be life. Sigh :dry:.
     
  13. aoeu

    aoeu Well-Known Member

    I've got to say, space debris in space doesn't really arouse my interest :p
     
  14. Tobes

    Tobes Well-Known Member

    If life came to be on this planet, and considering the fact that asteroids, some containing bacteria, are crashing into planets all the time, I see no reason as to why there isn't life on other planets. I doubt that we'll find it in our lifetime, and we almost definitely won't make contact unless they make contact first, but I find it depressing to think that the universe is so goddamn big and have nothing in it except big empty planets. I am aware that Earth is special, that it is pretty much the perfect distance from the sun, the right density, and so on, but with all the millions of galaxies there must be more planets with the right conditions like ours. If there is any life, it would probably on planets many lightyears away, so it doesn't really matter I guess, we probably won't know about it any time soon.
     
  15. Mikeintx

    Mikeintx Well-Known Member


    I undertand your reasoning, but turn around what you are saying. There are a hundred billion stars in the Milky Way. An estimated 6 billion of them have planets orbiting them. Even if a million of those planets harbored intelligent, space faring life, what is the chance of those civilizations visiting all of the other billions of stars across the 100,000 light years of our galaxy? Even with this huge amount of intelligent life the chance of them reaching us in the short period of time we have been on this earth and the likely short amount of time we have left is low.
     
  16. Reki

    Reki Well-Known Member

    You have no idea what you're talking about. For the record, I said estimated age, so don't go putting words in my mouth. Of course no one knows how old the universe actually is, but if you had ever taken a physics or cosmology course in your life, or had at least done a little research before raging at what was supposed to be light input on an interesting subject, you would know that there are rational estimates out there. I don't know what you have against me but you need to get your facts straight before you go shooting me down with your half baked knowledge.
     
  17. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

    ^^^ :hysterical:

    It's "half-baked" to use wisdom and acknowledge how little we know, and are, and concede to the forces that be? You certainly cannot repudiate the content of those amazing photographs which feebly attempt to prove how vast this universe is. Take a step back, look at those pictures, and think about how huge the abyss in one's logic would have to be to conclude that there isn't any other life in the universe.
     
  18. Reki

    Reki Well-Known Member

    I wish there was some way to explain to you everything that was wrong with what you just said. Again, don't put words in my mouth, I never said life didn't develop on other planets; I said the chance was slim, and it certainly is. While I'm no cosmologist, you apparently don't even have a basic understanding of what we think the universe to be or how it came to be at all.

    It's admirable to acknowledge that you don't know everything, to think that our insignificance should be a cause for concession is silly. The 'forces that be'? Did you write that under a rainbow? I didn't come here to debate, if you'd like to respond feel free to pm me, but I won't be checking this thread again.
     
  19. Prinnctopher's Belt

    Prinnctopher's Belt Antiquities Friend SF Supporter

    Wisdom.
     
  20. aoeu

    aoeu Well-Known Member

    Erm, bacteria on asteroids? Source?
     
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