truth about psychiatry

Discussion in 'Therapy and Medication' started by roro, Aug 19, 2007.

  1. roro

    roro Well-Known Member

  2. Terry

    Terry Antiquities Friend Staff Alumni

    There have been quite a few cases lately of anti-depressants making people worse. Not sure but didnt they find the "happy pill" Prozac to be an offender?
     
  3. Driretlanii

    Driretlanii Active Member

    Back in my past my psychiatrist has put me into 3 Prozac per day and no benzodiazepines to control the anxiety... well, that had a bad effect on me - 3 months without closing my eyes, allucinations from sleep privation and so on... not recommended.
     
  4. roro

    roro Well-Known Member

    The same thing happened to me, they tried Paxil at first, and SSRI and it threw me into a manic state. after 5 days of no sleep, no appetite, I finally refused. I finally got xanax and my anxiety was much better. But it is addictive, and I had a hard time with detox from it.

    Here is a clip from one of the articles:

    In my opinion the arguments about the failure to diagnose infections causing brain symptoms presented by Frank Strick are persuasive and sound. Most psychiatric consultations almost certainly are not concerned with exploring diagnostic considerations outside the psychiatric realm. This whole field of psychiatric diagnosis needs to be reconsidered in view of the strong evidence that toxoplasmosis, parasitic infections, borrelia burgdorfi, candida, borna disease virus, streptococcus, and other infectious agents are capable of producing impaired brain function with symptoms that will generate a psychiatric diagnosis in a conventional psychiatrist's office. There is a real possibility that many, perhaps most patients, have an infectious illness that is correctable not a permanent psychiatric impairment. This failure to discover infectious causes for psychiatric symptoms is tragic because many persons are vegetating in psychiatric facilities for the remainder of their lives, instead of recovering full health when their infection is cured. My suggestion to readers is to consider exploring a consultation with the Research Institute for Infectious Mental Illness before accepting a psychiatric diagnosis that is likely to lead to a lengthy and minimally effective therapy.


    I was just recently dx with lyme, babesia and other things. I almost got brushed off as just havng mental illness, when its really infectious! From Johns Hopkins, no less. I have been doing some reading up, and babesia (thought to be the main culprit in my illness) can be fatal! Its like malaria! YIKES!!!!

    I have been doing some reading up on the subject of infectious diseases masquerading as mental illness, here is one:

    http://www.newswithviews.com/Howenstine/james16.htm

    I can't find it right now, but I read one on find articles that had a lot of good info, and one on a teen who kept trying to commit suicide and found out she had lyme.

    I found an autopsy report of a woman who died after being institutionalized for many years, apparently had an infectious cause to her illness confirmed at autopsy and died at 35 of "old age" That was the one that ultimately made me either want to get better or die.

    Its criminal for a doctor to commit someone to mental illness when they really have an infectious illness.

    I am starting to believe that the whole field of psychiatry is a big fraud. I think it is definitely necessary, for some who are addicted to drugs, to make it legal for them to be treated if they obviously need some kind of medicine to cope with life. But to force people without fully trying anti-infectious agents is just wrong. I know a lot of these ideas come from the scientologists, and I am not one of those. I have thought for a long time that mental illness was simply infections in the brain. I just never knew there were real scientists and doctors who shared my views. (not that I am not a REAL scientist, lol, but I am not a medical scientist)

    If someone is crying out for help, with mostly physical ailments, fever, arthritis confirmed on MRI, etc, to just ignore their illness and send them to a psychiatrist is criminal.

    I am not saying I am going to go back and try to sue any dr for misdiagnosing me, I am not letigious, and I would not want to risk any problems with my current dr for his dx.

    But if I ever get well, I am going to do something to fight for this issue. Not just lyme, any disease that is misdiagnosed as mental illness. I will not be one of the ones to forget and go on to be happy in my life. I will go on and help others.

    To think.......I came very close to being labelled "mentally ill" stuck in an institutin to be experimented on like a lab rat, while dying of babesia!!! SCARY. How many people are out there now dying of brain disease that might have a simple treatment? The medical community really sucks big time.
     
  5. silent_enigma

    silent_enigma Well-Known Member

    That site posted in the OP looks like it's run by scientologists. It reminds me of the way young earth creationists do "research".

    Anyway, I've heard enough personal testimonies of AD's making people feel better to know not to listen to extreme "one way or the other" editorials.
     
  6. honsou

    honsou Well-Known Member

    yeah psychiatry is only good at treating two things, schizophrenia and bi polar disorder. And even then they are basically just writing you a script. So yeah psychiatry is really a totally crock, they should just let psychologist write scrips if they notice something, they are better trained to reconized mental illness. A psychiatrist has maybe 2 years of training with actual mental illness, most of there time is spent in medical school learning doctor stuff instead of what they should be learning.
     
  7. MrDepressed

    MrDepressed Guest

    I would be interested in seeing a system implemented that was along the lines of the psychiatrist/psychologist meeting with a person over time, and they match the symptoms with the closest diagnosis and if it is found that the person should possibly be on a medication the diagnosis is taken to a certified pharmacist that would than prescribe medication.. not sure if that would be any better.. hmmm