Vocabulary

Discussion in 'I Have a Question...' started by Unregistered_help, Dec 23, 2008.

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  1. What are some things I can do to improve my vocabulary? I have the same vocab as a four year old kid.

    How would you rate YOUR vocabulary?
     
  2. snowraven

    snowraven Well-Known Member

    I think the best way to improve your vocabulary is to read. Find a book on something you are interested in and have a dictionary beside you for any words you may not understand. You could even write a list of a few words to learn each day. I had an Egyptian friend who was learning english and each day he would try to learn five new words. Best of luck.
     
  3. Amelia

    Amelia Member

    There's a site that can help you learn new words to expand your vocabulary, and also, when you get a word correct, they donate 20 grains of rice to starving people to help world hunger. So you can increase your vocabulary AND help feed the world! :smile:

    http://www.freerice.com/index.php
     
  4. There's a book called, 30 Days to a More Powerful Vocabulary by Dr. Wilfred Funk and Norman Lewis. It's a pretty old book, but I think they make revised editions and they also make newer books.. The book has test sections which helps you actually remember what you're learning. It's a very good way to start building a more "adult" vocabulary.
     
  5. gentlelady

    gentlelady Staff Alumni

    snowraven is right. Challenge yourself by reading books that have a larger vocabulary than you are used to readuing. Take th time to look up words you are unsure of. Look at how they are used in context. You can also use word power in readers digest. You also need to make a concious effort to use words you are not accustomed to.
     
  6. jameslyons

    jameslyons Well-Known Member

    Everything in life can be learned from, "The Brothers Karamazov", but to build one's vocabulary I suggest Henry James. There is an additional effect of reading Henry James which is not unlike sitting through a speech delivered by President Bush; one develops an acute sense of boredom.

    :)

    I too suggest reading more books.

    I am, however, amazed that somebody has yet to recommend crossword puzzles.

    James.
     
  7. ToHelp

    ToHelp Well-Known Member

    Ah, tis my forte. ^ She nailed it. You expand by emulation, or copying styles and learning those nagging new words (GAWD that frustrated me, the big words, lol)...

    And my teacher? Stephen King. 'Nuff said. He was my strongest early influence.

    And from there... well. Along came the Internet and it was like *magic*. I grew exponentially both in writing and vocab.

    ToHelp
     
  8. hammockmonkey

    hammockmonkey Well-Known Member

    Extensive and useless.
     
  9. hammockmonkey

    hammockmonkey Well-Known Member

    buy a SAT book or a GRE book and they'll have some good vocab words for you. Or, just read a lot.
     
  10. ToHelp

    ToHelp Well-Known Member

    Also important you write as much as you may feel so inclined. Writing and incorporating new words is a powerful way of assimilating the more variegated voculary you are after. Moreover, when you both read and write towards this aim, you will find yourself coming across new words all the time in context.

    I know you didn't start out saying, "I want be a writer"; the fact is emuliation of that which challenge ourselves with is how all of us learn anything.

    ToHelp
     
  11. aoeu

    aoeu Well-Known Member

    I have a good vocabulary, but "fuck" is by far my favourite word.
     
  12. emanresu

    emanresu Guest

    quality > quantity
     
  13. ToHelp

    ToHelp Well-Known Member

    Would have to propound that doesn't really apply. Quantity makes variety possible, while quality here is purely subjective.
     
  14. emanresu

    emanresu Guest

    Thank you for keeping editors in business.
     
  15. ToHelp

    ToHelp Well-Known Member

    Good Heavens! Editors of good prose are evil? :laugh:

    Merry Christmas
     
  16. hammockmonkey

    hammockmonkey Well-Known Member

    It is true most editors are failed writers, than again so are most writers.

    --ts eliot.
     
  17. ToHelp

    ToHelp Well-Known Member

    Bravo! Apropos! :clap:
     
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