Going to the doctors?

Discussion in 'Mental Health Disorders' started by xoCherie, May 15, 2012.

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  1. xoCherie

    xoCherie Well-Known Member

    I've had my friends recommend I go to the doctors to actually get diagnosed with depression, but I feel like I'll just be annoying them. Plus I don't know what to say. Uhm...what did you do when you went to the doctor to get diagnosed?
     
  2. lightbeam

    lightbeam Antiquities Friend

    I went and told them what I experienced. The more detail you are able to give them, the better.
     
  3. MisterBGone

    MisterBGone Well-Known Member

    It's pretty easy, really, all you do is go in and tell them what's been going on. What's been giving you difficulty? What's been keeping you from living your life to the fullest? If they decide to test you for depression: because that's what your symptoms suggest, they will then ask you a series of questions. Things like, have you been feeling an abnormally low mood lately, and has it lasted longer than two weeks, etc. Anyway, at the end there will be a score, and a diagnosis based upon that score. I have it pretty bad: major depressive disorder. But the only way to find out for certain is to get examined by a doctor. The opinions and burdens of your friends should honestly be the least of your worries, especially when it comes to your own mental health. Trust me!
     
  4. Growing Pains

    Growing Pains Well-Known Member

    I vaguely recall having to fill out a form that asked specific questions (I guess to pin point symptoms?), but I'm not sure if that's standard as I haven't been to a psych doc in years. It's pretty simple, honestly. You just tell them how you've been feeling, explain what you've been going through, things like that. It doesn't hurt to have a diagnosis. I'd like to go back one day myself and get re-diagnosed. It can be hard to talk at first, but if you feel like going would benefit you it would be good to at least consider it.
     
  5. Mr Stewart

    Mr Stewart Well-Known Member

    Don't worry about being a bother to doctors. When the topic is broached they tend to take it very seriously. Depression is a whole lot more serious than the sniffles and GP's see hundreds of people a month for that. haha.

    Also, don't worry about what to say. That seems to be a common source of anxiety about it. Thinking how to communicate your whole entire story of depression, it feels overwhelming. The thing is, your doctor will guide you through all of that one question at a time. Once they understand that you're talking about depression, and perhaps mood disorders in general, they will take over the conversation. You just have to answer as honestly as you can manage.

    The procedure is straightforward: they may send you for blood tests to rule out physical explanations for your problems, they may ask some other stuff about family medical history, then they'll tackle the depression specific questions that MisterBGone described. You may not be diagnosed immediately. That depends on whether you feel you would benefit from a referral to a psychiatrist/psychologist. They may ask you if you would like to start taking medication right away. That's up to you. It can be a short process or a long one depending on your symptoms; whether we're talking about depression alone or extra stuff on top of it.
     
  6. xoCherie

    xoCherie Well-Known Member

    Thanks guys. It helped slightly. I'll hopefully ask my friend that I'm hanging out with tonight...I mainly don't know how to broach the subject in general, I'd feel weird going in and after they ask "how are you?" just replying "oh you know, suicidal..." :/ I don't know how to...open into the topic.
     
  7. MisterBGone

    MisterBGone Well-Known Member

    It's fairly straight forward and does not need to be harder than it sounds.... If you go in through the hospital's emergency room: in registration, simply tell them how you're feeling (e.g. Supremely Depressed: effecting quality of life, thoughts of hurting oneself, suicide etc.) They should recommend for you to be evaluated: your mental health; by one of the doctors on staff (hopefully you don't have to settle for a nurse practitioner). What they can do for here, is release you with a temporary prescription for some medications, such as antidepressants and/or antianxiety; but those will need to be refilled, monitored or changed by a personal doctor or yours, general physician or preferably psychiatrist (who you need a referral to see, from the G.P.). Of course, if you convince them that you are in immediate danger for suicide, they would likely keep you there, in the behavioral health unit. But the best policy is always to tell the truth. There's the old saying that the two people you least want to lie to, for your own good, are your psychiatrist and your lawyer! In the E.R. they may be able to setup an appointment with a doctor for you, the downside is that it may take some time depending on how busy they are there. And that's the other route, making an appointment with your current doctor, and then waiting to see him or her. But really, there's nothing to be embarrassed about or feel ashamed over, thousands of patients visit hospitals and clinics each day for the very same reason, so the only thing that's unusual for you is that you haven't done it before. But once you do--it get's easier! :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2012
  8. Mr Stewart

    Mr Stewart Well-Known Member

    In my own experience it's just a simple matter of saying something like "I'm having a lot of problems with depression". You don't have to bring up suicide yourself. That question will get asked by the doctor as part of the series of depression questions. It might be vague, like "what do you think about when you're in your worst periods of depression?". Something like that.

    Ha! I like that.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2012
  9. xoCherie

    xoCherie Well-Known Member

    Yeah, I'm not going to go through the hospital :/ I've got two doctors that I trust. I'm not wasting the hospital's time. Plus I can't get down to it easily, it takes a train and bus trip of two hours
     
  10. xoCherie

    xoCherie Well-Known Member

    I still can't see myself just walking in and bringing it up though
     
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