Questions for people who work despite depression

Discussion in 'Mental Health Disorders' started by nicesinging1, Oct 21, 2010.

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  1. nicesinging1

    nicesinging1 Well-Known Member

    Hello, everyone. My questions are specifically targeted for people who have been working long time despite chronic and severe depression.
    1. How do you get the energy to get up every morning like clockwork, commute, work with colleagues, and deal with all the stresses incurred from work? How do you show up at work every day without calling in sick every other week?
    2. How often do you feel like you are dragging your body to work? Work requires lots of energy. How do you maintain your balance and energy without burning out at work?
    3. How do you get the motivation and strength to reject the feeling of being tempted to feel sorry for oneself? I feel sorry for myself when I don't do things I should due to depression, no energy, no interest and apathy.
    Thanks in advance for any insights.
     
  2. Domo

    Domo Well-Known Member

    I've been working full time for a few years now.

    How do i get the energy to get up? Well i just force myself. I've made a commintment and i have people that rely on me. I have a mortgage i have to pay. If i lost my job, i'd lose my house and my freedom. So i guess i use that as motivation.

    Some days i do call in sick. But i also know that i feel a million time worse when i stay in bed all day soaking in my misery. At least at work i can be distracted a bit. Sometimes it is really bloody hard and i have to leave the office for 10 minutes if i feel like i am going to cry. But my boss is aware of my issues and is quite flexible and caring with me.

    At the moment, for the most part i am feeling very stable so it's not as horrible to get up and face the day as it once was. Back when i was at my worst i couldn't even leave the house, let alone get out and work.

    Feeling sorry for myself has never really been a big theme for me. Sure there are times i get into that mindset. But it really doesn't achieve anything. Everyone has their own struggles, this is mine.

    I wish i had some wisdom or insight for you, but i simply don't. I just somehow manage to continue on...
     
  3. Madam Mim

    Madam Mim Well-Known Member

    I've suffered with severe depression since I was twelve. I worked full-time from when I was 19 to 24, and am now a full-time student with two part-time jobs. I've only ever taken one day off sick in my whole life.

    1. How do you get the energy to get up every morning like clockwork, commute, work with colleagues, and deal with all the stresses incurred from work? How do you show up at work every day without calling in sick every other week?

    I've often wondered this about myself, but I've recently discovered that I have what's called a 'strategic survival personality', which is the result of being sent to boarding school aged 7. This is what makes me able to function on a daily basis, as not getting up and at least acting 'normal' just isn't an option for me. I spend so much of my time and energy hiding my issues from the world that it would cause many more problems if I didn't turn up to uni/work.


    2. How often do you feel like you are dragging your body to work? Work requires lots of energy. How do you maintain your balance and energy without burning out at work?

    I have to literally talk myself into getting out of bed every day. I have the same argument with myself and finally reach some sort of truce, which allows me to get up and at least attempt to get through another day. I sometimes fail, and have had breakdowns and panic attacks at work, but for me I consider this to be such a failure that I beat myself up over it and force myself to not let it happen again. Maintaining balance is all about pacing yourself and knowing your limitations.


    3. How do you get the motivation and strength to reject the feeling of being tempted to feel sorry for oneself?

    I sometimes do feel sorry for myself, but I consider that a luxury I can't afford. Once I start to slide down that path I don't think I'd ever recover. So I generally just don't let myself think about things at all. I focus on my work and let that distract me, which actually works very well. While I'm busy at work I can't think about other things.

    I hope this helps a bit, although I'm becoming aware that I seem to be something of a unique case in that I'm highly functioning depite all the issues I'm dealing with. But I suppose at least I prove that it can be done.

    Mim
     
  4. down-and-maybeout

    down-and-maybeout Well-Known Member

    At the moment I'm not working, though this is not through choice (I must have sent off about 50 applications in the past three months!!).

    However... when I was working, my motivation - if that's the right word - came from knowing that every minute I spend sitting here at work is earning me a little bit of extra cash into my bank account, to stop me worrying about bills and to enable me to buy myself the things that I want without relying on state benefits. I have very few friends, none whom I can confide my darkest and deepest in, so the things that I have (and my dog, whom I buy treats and toys for lol) are my main form of comfort.

    That's about 60% of it.

    The other 40% comes from the 'fear', if you like, of being out of work and on JobSeekers Allowance. This situation in itself is making my Depression worse and worse as time goes on. For me, I need to work for the good of my mental health.

    I hope that helps :)
     
  5. Frank Smith

    Frank Smith Member

    I am in university and work on the weekends. Have to start at 7 in the morning which means getting up before 6. When I do get there, never do I get use to waking up so early, I am tired, lethargic and my whole body feels awkward. And the thing about my job is that there is very little to do. More times than not I have left hours early without anyone noticing, once I even skipped a day and no one noticed.

    The lack of work means I sound most of the time wandering the shop floor, looking for places to hide. The long useless hours give me too much time to dwell on my many problems and I would have quit, like I did in another similar job, but I need the money now more than ever.
     
  6. Madam Mim

    Madam Mim Well-Known Member

    Hey Frank Smith,

    Have you tried looking for a different job? Perhaps something that starts later but would be busier? It appears you work in a shop, so perhaps you could try other shops that would give you more to do. It's starting to come up to Christmas, so many shops will be looking for extra staff soon anyway.

    Mim
     
  7. Frank Smith

    Frank Smith Member

    I have, kind of. Last year I had a job where the managers liked me and such, but there was so little to do and the area was just so dead, I quit and continued with my tempoary job, despite the fact the manager there hated me (and eveyone to be fair). Ended up getting released from there because of the credit crunch and had little choice but the job i have now.

    The thing is, this job is pernament and i only work weekends. Hard to find another job like that. Also, the jobs I'm looking at now are ones with, I hope, career prospects. Me being 21 and all.
     
  8. GA_lost

    GA_lost Well-Known Member

    For 23 years, I worked a fairly demanding job. Most of the time, I did well and received good performance reports. Mainly the reason I kept on going was that I relied upon myself to earn the money I needed to live. Even that though was not enough when I had supervisors who began to bully me. In my last year and a half, my depression overwhelmed me and I could not work anymore. Rather someone with a mild to moderate depression can usually work if it is essential to your well being, but extra stress can push you to a severe depression you can not work through.
     
  9. Madam Mim

    Madam Mim Well-Known Member

    It is very hard to find a job that fits in with a full-time degree. Even more so to find one that will provide career opportunities too. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't stop looking, as the perfect job might be just around the corner.

    Has your university got a careers service? If so, I would go and speak to them, because they have access to a lot of the job advertisments and might just have the ideal thing for you. And if not, they will be able to advise you of your options anyway.

    Mim
     
  10. sinnssykdom

    sinnssykdom Banned Member

    It is difficult everyday. I work in retail so i am forced to put on a happy face and be delightful to everyone despite what i am feeling inside. I am forced to be somewhat patient despite my 'short fuse' due to depression.

    It is difficult to go to work, it is difficult to wake up - difficult to do everything. However surprisingly i have been pretty good about showing up on time and have always made it within 15 minutes of when the shift starts which they don't really mind as long you're not opening or the only one.

    There are times when i go on break and i just don't want to come back but i am forced to because i can't just flake out like that. It just isn't the way i role despite how down or awful i may feel.

    Lastly due to the fact of hiding my issues the majority of my life that also has played in a large part think about getting by day to day.

    My biggest issue is that i don't like saying especially since i really could use the money so when they ask me if i can work overtime then i usually say yes. I am actually hired as part time(as most min wage workers are)/5 days a week/37 hours but since i work so much overtime so i basically am full time there are often times when i don't get a day off for weeks at a time and THAT is stressful.

    It's a learning experience for me being that it's one of my first jobs. I have worked in almost all departments and i know now from the experience which things i won't do again because they are just stressful and it just puts me too close to the edge.
     
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