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A word on OCD: the Doubting Disease

alixer

We are all one
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#1
Just wanted to share some useful knowledge to anyone with OCD but mostly for anyone who knows anyone with OCD. OCD is known as the doubting disease where the search for validation fuels the anxiety, so it's not good to validate or negate the thoughts of someone with an obsession. The answer is for them to turn to their therapeutic techniques to work through anxieties themselves.

While answering their questions about whether their anxieties are valid or not offers relief for them in the short term, it's bad in the long term because then the thought that the anxiety can be remedied through obsession is ingrained.
 
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Freyja

Not staff. Freyja with a j.
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#2
Thank you for writing this, I agree :)
Also, in case you have some resources or know about "therapeutic techniques" for (pretty severe) anxiety, I would be interested. (therapy is not an option with the person I'm thinking about) I understand that I would need to describe the situation and everything, so if not, it's okay ;-) Just generally asking.
 

Walker

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#3
I would really struggle with the person who was feeding my OCD tendencies. That's not to say that one just ignores these things but if someone is feeding that within you, that's a real problem.
 

alixer

We are all one
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#4
Thank you for writing this, I agree :)
Also, in case you have some resources or know about "therapeutic techniques" for (pretty severe) anxiety, I would be interested. (therapy is not an option with the person I'm thinking about) I understand that I would need to describe the situation and everything, so if not, it's okay ;-) Just generally asking.
Glad you found the post helpful. There are several techniques for combating obsessions and reducing compulsions. I'm not a therapist so I don't necessarily want to advocate one over another since OCD manifests in vastly different ways. I would say I have noticed a trend that many techniques seem to center around the concept of the person accepting doubt and in turn accepting risk -- the reason being that the compulsions to deal with the obsessions outweigh the benefits. For example, a person who has to check whether a door is locked many times may perhaps decrease the chances that the door was left unlocked but at what cost did it come? Plus, it's been shown that people who checked whether a door is indeed locked multiple times end up actually being less sure than those who simply locked the door, and let things be.
There are a few books on OCD. I would certainly stick to ones written by respected practitioners. But really, I didn't start to discover truly effective techniques until I sought counseling. Personalized therapy usually comes at a cost but when I found myself low on cash I found a free group therapy. So that would be my recommendation to your friend. If personalized counseling is not an option atm then seek out group therapy (as like I said, they are often free) and connect with others with OCD, preferably through conferences and well-moderated groups so as to avoid low-quality information. Hope that helps, and I wish your friend well. The commonly repeated notion that there is no cure for OCD has not been conclusively proven. Many therapists believe people can be cured or at least experience long periods, years, with reduced to no symptomology. Like I say in my post, OCD is known as the doubting disease. I think one thing that is certain is that doing nothing is not a remedy.
 

Walker

Admin-a-monkey
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#5
Many therapists believe people can be cured or at least experience long periods, years, with reduced to no symptomology.
I took a *load* of Prozac way back in the day and never had to take anything again...... for about 20 years when I had a sudden and unexpected resurface of symptoms. I am hoping the same thing happens again.
 

Freyja

Not staff. Freyja with a j.
SF Supporter
#6
Glad you found the post helpful. There are several techniques for combating obsessions and reducing compulsions. I'm not a therapist so I don't necessarily want to advocate one over another since OCD manifests in vastly different ways. I would say I have noticed a trend that many techniques seem to center around the concept of the person accepting doubt and in turn accepting risk -- the reason being that the compulsions to deal with the obsessions outweigh the benefits. For example, a person who has to check whether a door is locked many times may perhaps decrease the chances that the door was left unlocked but at what cost did it come? Plus, it's been shown that people who checked whether a door is indeed locked multiple times end up actually being less sure than those who simply locked the door, and let things be.
There are a few books on OCD. I would certainly stick to ones written by respected practitioners. But really, I didn't start to discover truly effective techniques until I sought counseling. Personalized therapy usually comes at a cost but when I found myself low on cash I found a free group therapy. So that would be my recommendation to your friend. If personalized counseling is not an option atm then seek out group therapy (as like I said, they are often free) and connect with others with OCD, preferably through conferences and well-moderated groups so as to avoid low-quality information. Hope that helps, and I wish your friend well. The commonly repeated notion that there is no cure for OCD has not been conclusively proven. Many therapists believe people can be cured or at least experience long periods, years, with reduced to no symptomology. Like I say in my post, OCD is known as the doubting disease. I think one thing that is certain is that doing nothing is not a remedy.
This actually helped me, thank you :)
Have a nice day!
 

alixer

We are all one
SF Supporter
#7
I took a *load* of Prozac way back in the day and never had to take anything again...... for about 20 years when I had a sudden and unexpected resurface of symptoms. I am hoping the same thing happens again.
I know it must be disheartening to have symptoms again but I hope you are heartened by the very long period of remission. That’s actually very impressive.
 

Walker

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#8
I was very happy with the long period of remission, @alixer And the symptoms now are much less than before. It was hmm "pointed out" to me that they were returning and I went off to get meds early on before it could get far worse / get really into "giving in" to the actual "compulsions" part of it. There have been and always will be things I've hung on to over all those years but nothing that was taking over my day by any stretch. It was extremely livable - maybe things people who weren't living with me wouldn't even notice. So now that its back, so to speak, I'm hanging on to the idea that I can possibly get rid of it again. Meds are really helping a lot. I've only been on them about 2 months.
 

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