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Therapy round 2

Legate Lanius

Try not to kill yourself 2020 challenge.
#43
I'm seeing a new gal of the psychoanalytical school of thought. I've only seen her twice already, so still very early days but I think her methodology might just be the right one for me. Anything new with you?
They're screening me for autism and other neuro-garbage in a couple of months (will come back negative, but my family keeps saying that it will help somehow), but I haven't seen any professionals since last spring. No chems or therapy since last spring or thereabouts. Thanks for asking.

Which methodology is it?
 

Dark111

Scholar's Mate
SF Supporter
#44
They're screening me for autism and other neuro-garbage in a couple of months (will come back negative, but my family keeps saying that it will help somehow), but I haven't seen any professionals since last spring. No chems or therapy since last spring or thereabouts. Thanks for asking.

Which methodology is it?
Just to clarify, when it comes to the actual practice of psychoanalysis, as opposed to the model used in research, it's more commonly referred to as the psychoanalytic "approach" or "technique". Most often four aspects make up the psychoanalytic technique: interpretation, transference analysis, technical neutrality, and countertransference analysis. I would consider this a "method" but if you're interested in looking into it yourself, you'll find these terms are often used interchangeably.

Therapists today mostly use the Rogerian, client-centred approach which I find a bit nebulous and lacking in direction, whereas psychoanalysis is much more challenging. But it really is all down to what works for each individual and where they are in their own lives. The Rogerian approach clearly has many benefits. The person centred model strengthens the relationship between client and the therapist, helping the client feel more comfortable and so more open to discuss their true feelings; an integral part of the therapist’s role is to help the individual to feel understood and accepted. The client also plays a key role during the therapy but it is up to the therapist to encourage the client to work through his or her own feelings, helping the client to understand his or her own thoughts on their condition. Key to this is the idea that “the individual knows his own personality and problems far better than the therapist ever can, and it’s the therapists job to encourage the individual to proceed on a self-determinative basis” This is all very commendable of course, but it relies upon the willingness of the therapist to spend, quite often, a considerable period of time waiting for a breakthrough to be made”. A criticism here would be the potential for prolonging of the very symptoms that the client has come to therapy for and the lack of discouraging these conditions by the therapist, which only serves to validate this behaviour and instil in the client a belief that the negative patterns of behaviour are in fact effective and viable responses. Although the passage of time plays an important role in any psychotherapeutic approach, for some clients this passage of time offers them a chance to stall, in that they can believe themselves to be making progress, since they are undergoing therapy, but can also avoid any uncomfortable or upsetting areas up for discussion by placing the therapy in a kind of holding pattern.

Of course any form of therapy, to be effective, takes resolute commitment from both therapist and client. But it's well known that Psychoanalytic therapies are hard work. I tried psychoanalysis years ago and hated it. I've also read plenty about what a "dead" school of thought it is. But it is often still recommended by psychiatrists when they see for themselves that you're impossible to argue with. The problem is your own arguments for self-annihilation and other-annihilation actually make sense. That's when they send in the big guns.
 

Legate Lanius

Try not to kill yourself 2020 challenge.
#45
Of course any form of therapy, to be effective, takes resolute commitment from both therapist and client. But it's well known that Psychoanalytic therapies are hard work. I tried psychoanalysis years ago and hated it. I've also read plenty about what a "dead" school of thought it is. But it is often still recommended by psychiatrists when they see for themselves that you're impossible to argue with. The problem is your own arguments for self-annihilation and other-annihilation actually make sense. That's when they send in the big guns.
Why are you trying it again if it didn't work last time?
 

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